Click to enlarge

Right on the back of Volkswagen’s two-door city specialist concept launched at Frankfurt, the up!, comes the space up! Concept, which as the name suggests, offers more space. The latest member of VW’s New Small Family range is strangely called the “largest small VW”, if that makes any sense, and at 3.68 metres length and 1.63 meters wide, it’s a small matter of 23cm longer than the up!

This results in a wheelbase of 2.56m, nearly 10cm longer than their current supermini, the Fox, despite being over 12cm shorter in overall length.

The entire concept is to create as much interior room as possible without taking up that much space on the road, hence offering the space of a considerably larger vehicle. The clever space concept of the space up! is mostly thanks to its rear-engine layout just like on the Beetle and the Bulli (Microbus) of the past.

Thanks to its elongated wheelbase, the space up! offers four doors, although there are in fact six doors (twice as many as the three-door hatchback up!) in this van concept car as the boot is accessed via a pair of fridge doors. Behind this door are 220 to 1,005 litres of cargo space given the multi-configurable four seat positions.

Design details include a front end featuring headlamps that take an inward diagonal line, the horizontally integrated air inlets (minimized aperture optimizes aerodynamics), the VW logo arranged on the front hood (as the only exterior detail kept in chrome) and the smooth-surfaced bumper with a lower segment.

From the side, the long extended window section flows from a clearly distinctive, powerful C-pillar to an A-pillar positioned far forward in a van-like manner. The space between the A and C pillars is spanned by the line of butterfly doors with opposing hinges. These suicide doors, in the style of the legendary Samba bus, extend across nearly the entire space between the wheel housings – i.e. the entire sill length – all four seating positions are exceptionally convenient to access.

The rear doors seem to fill up practically the entire car area above the bumper. The doors are asymmetrically split 1/3 to 2/3 and when fully opened, offer a cargo width of just over a metre.

While it certainly looks futuristic, its not really that over the top and you can imagine it going into production sometime in the future.


Click to enlarge


Click to enlarge


Click to enlarge


Click to enlarge


Click to enlarge


Click to enlarge


Click to enlarge


Click to enlarge


Click to enlarge


Click to enlarge


Click to enlarge


Click to enlarge


Click to enlarge


Click to enlarge


Click to enlarge


Click to enlarge


Click to enlarge


Click to enlarge


Click to enlarge


Click to enlarge


Click to enlarge


Click to enlarge


Click to enlarge