Renault is going mainstream in Indonesia. To do that, one will have to play in the core segments here, which is the Low Cost Green Car category (three row models include the Toyota Calya, Daihatsu Sigra and Datsun GO+) and the Low MPV class (Toyota Avanza and Daihatsu Xenia twins, Honda Mobilio, Suzuki Ertiga, and the Mitsubishi Xpander and Nissan Livina tag team).

Here’s the car that the French brand thinks can straddle both budget segments, the Renault Triber. First unveiled in India in June, the three-row MPV (with a touch of SUV design, as is the norm these days) is designed primarily for India, as the sub-four metre length (3,990 mm) proves.

“India is a key market for Groupe Renault. For that reason, we are bringing Renault Triber, another breakthrough concept, targeted for India’s core market. Renault Triber was conceived, developed and produced in India, for Indian customers first, before we take it to the world. It is a real game-changer.” said Renault CEO Thierry Bollore at the car’s Indian debut.

Like a giant Kwid, the Triber sits on the same Alliance CMF-A platform. Unique design details include the unmissable kink in the windowline where the C pillars meet the rear door handles, and a stepped roof to free up extra headroom for the second and third row passengers.

The Triber is powered by a 1.0 litre three-cylinder engine with 72 hp and 96 Nm of torque at 3,500 rpm. The NA engine is paired to a five-speed manual and a five-speed automated manual transmission (AMT). Doesn’t sound like much, but the Triber does weighs below a tonne. A 1.0L turbo is said to be in future plans for India.

The top spec car’s equipment list includes a 3.5-inch multi-info display with digital speedometer, an 8.0-inch touchscreen head unit with Apple CarPlay, air con vents for all three rows, Renault’s usual “smart card” keyless entry and push start with auto lock, and 15-inch alloys. As for safety, there’s ABS and four airbags.

The third row seats can be fully removed to reveal 625 litres of boot space. This gives credence to Renault’s view that the Triber can also compete as a five-seat hatchback, albeit one with a rather high ground clearance (182 mm). In India, the French brand says that the Triber’s cost of ownership is 20% less than B-segment hatches.

In Indonesia, the Triber will be available in two trim levels – RXE and RXL, with MT or AMT options. There’s no official price yet, but Maxindo Renault Indonesia is targeting LCGC pricing with this CBU India import, which sounds ambitious. The warranty package is three years or 100,000 km, plus a year of free service.

The Renault Triber is now open for booking in the republic, with first deliveries scheduled for December 2019.