Kia has released the first official images of the all-new Optima, or K5 as it is known in its home market, and if you liked the prior sketches put forth by the Korean carmaker, you’ll like the look of the fifth-generation model.

A radical departure from the outgoing fourth-generation car, the latest Optima certainly gives an “intense first impression” as suggested. Adopting a sportback-like profile, the D-segment model certainly has a more dynamic look to it, with no shortage of attention-grabbing cues that make it stand out from the crowd.

The front end features a wider version of the company’s signature “tiger nose” grille, with the pinched middle section meeting up with two creases on the bonnet that stretch all the way to the windscreen.

Additional lines leading to the A-pillars can also be found originating from the tip of the tri-element headlamps, which blend into said grille, and sport “extended V” LED daytime running lights. To add to its visual presence, there’s an aggressive front bumper with larger corner inlets, while the central intake is highlighted by U-shaped trim.

While the new car has a rather busy face, its sides are “simpler” by comparison, with a main character line running beneath door handles and another from the wheel arches for an element of depth. A unique touch here is the chrome trim that runs along the top of the side windows, wrapping around the base of the rear window.

Moving towards the rear, we find small taillights that integrates the same V-shaped motif seen at the front, with the Kia logo placed just beneath the lip spoiler on the trunk lid, along with a full-width light bar linking the two clusters. Further down, the faux diffuser and dual chrome exhaust finishers contribute to the sporty look of the sedan, together with corner “outlets” beside the slim reflectors.

There are no live photos of the interior just yet, but based on an earlier sketch, expect an entirely new dashboard layout that is less cluttered and dominated by two displays. There’s also a new steering wheel design, piano key-style switchgear on the centre stack and a rotary gear selector, with additional controls (likely for the electronic parking brake and drive modes) placed just in front of the armrest.