Aston Martin has revealed the new Aston Martin DB11 Volante, the convertible version of the DB11 that was released last year. The DB11 is available with a 5.2 litre V12 or a Mercedes-AMG V8, but the Volante only comes with the latter, a 510 PS/675 Nm 4.0 litre twin-turbo unit mated to an eight-speed automatic gearbox.

With the lighter of the two engines, Aston Martin says that the DB11 Volante is lighter and more rigid than the model it replaces. Compared to its coupe sister, the Volante is 110 kg heavier with a kerb weight of 1,870 kg.

“The challenge of creating a convertible car is retaining structural and dynamic integrity. To protect the former you need strength and rigidity, but to preserve the latter you need to keep weight to a minimum. We have maximised the advantages of the DB11’s all-new bonded structure to underpin our new Volante with a structure that’s 26 kg lighter and 5% stiffer. The result is a car that combines greater performance and agility with increased comfort, refinement and interior space,” said Max Szwaj, Aston Martin’s CTO.

Visually the Volante features the striking single-piece aluminium bonnet and ‘Curlicue’ aerodynamic feature from the DB11 coupe, combined with new wood or carbon fibre veneer panels on the seat backs, a fabric hood – choose from bordeaux red, black silver or grey silver – dramatic ultra-slim ‘light blade’ tail lamps and new design forged alloys.

Gaydon says that the new eight-layer rag top combines the timeless appeal of a fabric hood with the latest acoustic and insulation materials. Folding to a class-leading stack height, the roof takes 14 seconds to lower and 16 seconds to close. It can be operated remotely from the key, or on the move at speeds of up to 50 km/h. The new hood system has also led to a 20% gain in boot volume compared to the DB9 Volante.

Aston Martin says that engineers subjected the roof to more than 100,000 cycles in special weather chambers designed to simulate conditions in the world’s harshest environments, compressing 10-years of use into a one month test. The lab test results of the were then validated with real world testing in locations including Death Valley and the Arctic Circle.