We finally have a launch date for the production Rimac C_Two. According to an Autocar report, the 1,914-hp electric hypercar will be unveiled at the Geneva motor show next March, and the Croatian automaker has already appointed London-based company, HR Owen, as its distributor.

To quickly recap, the C_Two is a four-motored hypercar that makes a ridiculous 1,914 hp and 2,300 Nm of torque, propelling it from standstill to 100 km/h in 1.97 seconds. It’s quite a feat for a car that weighs 1,950 kg (kerb weight), but what’s more impressive is that it sprints from zero to 300 km/h in 11.8 seconds, before maxing out at 412 km/h.

When you’re not outperforming Teslas and Ferraris, the C_Two’s 120 kWh lithium manganese nickel battery pack – which weighs 700 kg – offers up to 650 km of range (NEDC cycle; 547 km based on WLTP standards), and plugging into a 250 kW DC fast charger delivers up to 80% of charge in under 30 minutes. An onboard three-phase 22 kW charger is standard.

Other key USPs include a spacious cabin, which Rimac claims is “generally liveable with” and allows easy access. However, it’s unclear what the C_Two’s official name will be, at least for the time being.

Now, just 150 units of the Rimac C_Two will be built, and the starting price is around £2 million (nearly RM11 million) each. The company has already begun taking orders for the car, and UK-bound units will be delivered exclusively from HR Owen’s new £40 million (RM215 million) ‘experience centre’ in Hatfield, Hertfordshire.

Rimac says production of the C_Two will begin before the year’s end, because the automaker will build around 25 pre-production prototypes as well. However, the production versions will use a less complex single-speed transmission – previously, the car was supposed to get a two-speed dual-clutch automatic. The change is due to progress with electric motor design, and the new single-speed unit is lighter, too.

Meanwhile, company founder Mate Rimac has also announced plans to open a research and development centre in the UK because apparently, he “likes working with Brits,” and regards the UK as home to Europe’s best, most pragmatic engineers.