The Mercedes-AMG One hypercar is nearing completion. AMG global head of product management and sales, Michael Knöller told Road and Track: “When you make F1 technology street legal you have to go through a journey with the customers. We had some challenges, but now we’ve reached a tipping point.”

It’s not any run off the mill hypercar, no. The One is powered by a 1.6 litre V6 F1 engine, as opposed to using the brand’s revered 2.0 litre four-pot or 4.0 litre V8 block. One of the biggest challenges was getting the engine to idle stably at around 1,200 rpm so it would meet global emissions-test requirements – the race engine idles at 5,000 rpm.

Last year, AMG boss Tobias Moers said that cutting revolutions by 3,800 rpm was difficult, and then you have the added challenge of meeting noise regulations. Now imagine having a road-going hypercar idling at 5,000 rpm at the lights. That wouldn’t be too pleasant, would it?

With that, AMG appears to be back on track with the development of the car. First deliveries are scheduled to start in 2021, two years later than originally planned. In any case, only 275 examples of the One will be made, each with a base price of around 2.28 million euros (RM10.5 million). All units have been snapped up.

Let’s quickly gloss over the specs. Underneath the fin is a 1.6 litre turbocharged and direct-injected V6 directly from the 2016 F1 W07 Hybrid that took Nico Rosberg to his only world title, featuring pneumatic valve springs to enable it to spin at up to 11,000 rpm.

The rev limit is undoubtedly high for a road car, but in race tune it spools up to 15,000 rpm. The lower rev limit helps extend the engine’s life and enables the use of commercial RON 98 fuel. The engine also gets the same F1 split turbocharger system, and the powertrain is augmented with two electric motor-generator units.

The first motor, MGU-H (for heat), produces around 90 kW (120 hp) and scavenges energy from the exhaust to drive the compressor, thereby reducing turbo lag. Mercedes-AMG claims that the MGU-H system offers better engine response than that of a naturally-aspirated V8.

A second motor, MGU-K (for kinetic), is connected to the crankshaft and recuperates up to 80% of the car’s kinetic energy under braking. When called for, it delivers 120 kW (161 hp) of extra power, pushing output at the rear wheels alone to over 670 hp. Power is routed through a newly developed eight-speed automated manual gearbox.

All in, the One should offer well over 1,000 horsepower, sending it from standstill to 200 km/h in under six seconds. The top speed is said to be over 350 km/h. As far as we know, the One offers a pure electric driving range of 25 km, which is decent. An onboard 12-volt electrical system is standard, but the hybrid powertrain operates at 800 volts.

Other noteworthy bits include forged aluminium alloys (19 inches up front, 20 inches at the back) that are shod with specially-designed Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 tyres (285/35-section front and 335/20-section rear). Expect some lap records to be decimated by the AMG One, soon.