Volvo’s resurgence in the past decade is truly a story to be marvelled at, having gone through a successful transformative era which saw the introduction of a new range of ravishing cars, most of which are properly luxurious and powerful.

The younger folks may not know this, but Nils Bohlin, a little-known Volvo engineer who invented the V-type three-point safety belt design some 60 years ago, has saved more lives than anyone else in the world. That’s because, instead of monetising his invention, the company chose to share the patented design to competitors in an effort to encourage mass adoption.

Fast forward today, Volvo makes some of the most technically advanced cars from a safety standpoint, but in 2008 it also made a promise that nobody should be seriously injured or killed in a new Volvo car by 2020. It’s a bold proclamation, but there are proactive measures in place to realise that goal.

To start, the company will impose a 180 km/h speed limit on all its cars globally, with hopes to highlight the dangers of speeding. A quick check with a representative from Volvo Cars Malaysia also revealed that the speed cap will be introduced here, although the period with which it will be enforced has yet to be specified.

The problem with speeding, Volvo says, is that above certain speeds, in-car safety technologies are no longer enough to avoid severe injuries and fatalities in the event of an accident. Despite that, speeding remains ubiquitous and is one of the most common reasons for fatalities in traffic. “People simply do not recognise the danger involved in speed,” says Jan Ivarsson, one of Volvo Cars’ leading safety experts. Thoughts, guys?