Malaysian Institute of Road Safety Research (MIROS) will soon forward a proposal to the Malaysian Ministry of Transport to make helmet use compulsory for cyclists. This was said in a Tweet by Datuk Suret Singh, chairman of MIROS.

The proposal aims to reduce cyclists injuries in a crash, as research has shown cyclists, along with equestrians, run a high risk of head and brain injuries. However, for most Malaysian cycling groups, attending a ride usually means the cyclist wears a helmet on a voluntary basis, which a reminder saying, “no helmet, no ride,” appended to ride notifications.

In other countries, such as Australia which was the first to enact such a law, cycling requires the compulsory use of a helmet by law, which also includes children. Rule 256 of the Australian Road Rules states that “the rider of a bicycle must wear an approved bicycle helmet securely fitted and fastened on the rider’s head, unless the rider is exempt from wearing a bicycle helmet under another law of this jurisdiction,” with non-compliance attracting a fine.

In neighbouring Singapore, which is a fine country to live, a compulsory helmet law for cyclists has been in force since 2018. This includes bicycles whether power-assisted or not.