With the United Kingdom formally exiting the European Union due to Brexit, the Cross-Border Enforcement (CBE) Directive that was first introduced in 2015 will no longer affect UK drivers travelling abroad.

The directive allowed authorities in the bloc to pursue drivers for motoring offences, as long as their cars were registered in a country within the EU. Thanks to Brexit, UK cars are technically no longer registered in the EU, so they are exempt from the CBE.

According to Auto Express, more than 500,000 UK drivers are caught by speed cameras in France each year. With the arrangement ended, these drivers would not face any action once they returned home, costing the French government quite a bit of money, with those fines estimated to be worth around 60 million euros (around RM295 million) yearly.

However, this works both ways, as UK authorities would be unable to issue fines to EU drivers caught speeding on camera within its borders once they are back in their homelands. Should drivers from either the bloc or the UK be caught by authorities rather than a speed camera, they could still be issued with on-the-spot fines.

While this may be the way things work now, both French and UK authorities are reportedly seeking a bilateral agreement to keep the enforcement possible a la CBE. The UK has already done something similar with Switzerland, although it could take some time for such an agreement to be prepared with other EU countries.