Running red lights and going against the flow of traffic are the major complaints made about p-hailing (parcel, food delivery) riders, but the road transport department (JPJ) says it is difficult to take action against offenders due to insufficient evidence, Bernama reports.

According to the department’s deputy director-general of planning and operations, Aedy Fadly Ramli, most of these offences, especially those ignoring traffic light laws, were committed by riders chasing time in a bid to complete food deliveries quickly.

However, he said little can be done if there is no evidence of the misdemeanours. He urged the public to provide solid evidence such as video recordings or photographs, vehicle plate numbers, as well as the time and location of the incidents so as to facilitate enforcement.

“Most complaints we receive, especially on social media, are regarding p-hailing riders or drivers running red lights or travelling in the opposite direction of traffic on one-way streets. When there is clear, hard evidence, we can conduct investigations and when the offence is proven, we can issue summonses,” he said.

Presently, the p-hailing service is unregulated, but this is in the process of being carried out. The transport ministry has said that the government is expected to finalise regulations to oversee motorcycle parcel delivery p-hailing riders as soon as possible.

In July, transport minister Datuk Wee Ka Siong said that the ministry was set to regulate the industry under existing laws, and would also increase advocacy and safety campaigns among the riders and service providers.

Earlier this month, he said that the ministry had drafted a policy paper on the matter and it would be tabled for discussion at the Cabinet level. He said that the rules that will be implemented will also include regulations concerning the operations of riders, similar to that taken to regulate the e-hailing sector.