Spy-Shots of Cars
This image has been optimized for a calibrated screen with a Gamma of 2.2 and a colour temperature of 6500°K

Having just received a facelift at the tail end of last year, the current Mk7 iteration of the Volkswagen Golf still has quite a bit of wind left in its sails. However, it will have to be replaced eventually, and these renderings provide a glimpse of what the Mk8 generation – which is set to go on sale in 2019 – will look like.

These pictures show a Golf that is a subtle but clear evolution of the outgoing model, with a more angular look that follows the path treaded by the facelift. The LED headlights are slimmer – and feature a design similar to the Passat B8 – while the front intake design appears more aggressive and assertive.

The prominent radar sensor for the adaptive cruise control system seen here, however, will likely be replaced on the actual production model by one hidden within the Volkswagen badge, as is the case with the Mk7 facelift. The C-shaped LED daytime running lights should also be reserved as a signature design cue for the GTE plug-in hybrid and the all-electric e-Golf, just like the current models.

Along the sides, the already precise shoulder lines look to have been sharpened up some more, but the iconic C-shaped C pillar has been retained. At the rear, the L-shaped tail lights are reminiscent of the Tiguan, and the twin pipes for the sportier variants have been retained.

Spy-Shots of Cars
This image has been optimized for a calibrated screen with a Gamma of 2.2 and a colour temperature of 6500°K

Inside, the Golf should benefit from an even smarter cabin than the already functional and high-quality cockpit of the current model, with a neater design, plusher plastics and tighter fit and finish, plus the larger infotainment screens and optional digital instrument display from the Mk7 facelift.

In the wake of the diesel emissions cheating scandal, the Golf is also set to be cleaner than before. Auto Express reports that the new model will see the introduction of efficient, modular 1.5 litre three-cylinder turbodiesels, with outputs ranging from 74 hp to 120 hp. Carbon dioxide emissions are expected to dip below 85 grams per kilometre with these engines.

These are set to complement the 130 PS and 150 PS 1.5 litre TSI Evo turbo four-cylinder petrol mill that made their debut on the Mk7 facelift, with standard-fit Active Cylinder Technology (ACT) variable displacement. Of course, there will also be GTI and R variants that will be revealed further down the line – possibly with mild hybrid power – as well as the GTE and e-Golf models at the other end of the spectrum.

The future of the Golf line remains bright, despite Volkswagen’s commitment to producing a full lineup of dedicated I.D. electric vehicles, including a C-segment hatchback. The next-generation model will likely use an updated version of the existing MQB modular platform, set to provide a weight reduction of up to 50 kg.

GALLERY: Volkswagen Golf Mk7 facelift