Last month, we were in Athens to drive the all-new Range Rover Evoque. While our impressions will have to wait for the full review, we thought we’d give you a closer look at the latest version of the fashionable SUV, as Land Rover releases a full gallery of on-location images.

And what a beautiful location it was, too, full of stunning vistas overlooking the various lakes and oceans, rocky outcrops and gigantic wind turbines. We even drove over a narrow railway bridge to cross the perilous Corinth Canal, which isn’t exactly a feat for the faint of heart.

Back to the star of the show. Here, all-new really is all-new, as the Evoque ditches the D8 platform (itself a development of Ford’s EUCD underpinnings) in favour of a new Premium Transverse Architecture that will be shared with the next Discovery Sport and Jaguar E-Pace. The body structure uses a mix of high-strength steels and aluminium, with support for mild hybrid and plug-in hybrid powertrains.

In fact, a 48-volt mild hybrid is available at launch, providing a 140 Nm torque boost on all but the base two-wheel drive manual diesel model – all others get AWD and a nine-speed auto. Engines run the gamut of a 2.0 litre Ingenium turbo petrol engine with 200 PS, 249 PS and 300 PS outputs, along with a diesel version in 150 PS, 180 PS and 240 PS flavours. A plug-in hybrid and a three-cylinder petrol model will be offered next year.

The Evoque has always been a standout in terms of design, and this latest version keeps all of its visual hallmarks, such as the stretched head- and tail lights, rising beltline, falling roofline and chunky wheel arches. But it’s all cleaner, smoothened out, an aesthetic that’s been borrowed from the larger Velar. The latter also lends its flush door handles, while the optional R-Dynamic package adds unique burnished copper accents.

The minimalist approach continues inside, where the Evoque again lifts cues from the Velar. These include the Touch Pro Duo infotainment system, which uses a pair of 10-inch touchscreens and twin rotary dials to control various vehicular functions. You can also have the car with a variety of eco-friendly options, such as the Kvadrat wool and recycled plastic upholstery and Eucalyptus fabric trim.

A number of new technologies have been introduced as well, such as a digital ClearSight rear-view mirror and a ClearSight Ground View system that uses the exterior cameras to provide a projection of what’s under the bonnet. The latter, says, Land Rover, makes it easier to negotiate difficult parking spaces, navigate high city centre kerbs or tackle rough terrain.

Of course, no Land Rover is complete without its impressive off-road capabilities, and the Evoque is no exception. It uses the latest Terrain Response 2 to adapt to the conditions, and it can now wade through water up to 600 mm deep (previously 500 mm). On the flip side, Driveline Disconnect increases efficiency and can reengage AWD in just 400 milliseconds, while Adaptive Dynamics dampers improve body control.

No explicit timeframe yet for the Malaysian launch, but in the meantime feel free to browse the full gallery below. What do you think of the new Range Rover Evoque – is it a worthwhile reinvention of the trailblazing original? Sound off in the comments section after the jump.