Skoda has finally unveiled the facelifted Superb, which receives a number of subtle styling updates since the third-generation model made its debut way back in 2015. Revisions to the available equipment and powertrains are also part of the facelift, and the Czech carmaker also brought back a rugged estate version as an alternative to the regular sedan and estate body styles.

In terms of design changes, the Superb’s grille is now slightly larger, portrudes further down the bumper, and now features double slats. This results in an eight mm increase in length for the sedan (4,869 mm) and six mm for the Combi estate model (4,862 mm).

The matrix LED headlamps are new too, and they sport updated graphics and sequential turn signals. Below them, the slim LED fog lamps on the redesigned lower apron double as cornering lights. Around back, the Skoda badge has been replaced with lettering instead to ensure similarity with other models like the Kamiq. There’s also a full-width chrome trim that extends into the taillights.

The rugged estate version is called the Superb Scout, and it is essentially a successor to the Superb Outdoor that was offered with the second-generation model. Think of it like Skoda’s version of the Volvo V90 Cross Country, with plastic body cladding, a raised suspension (+15 mm) and underbody protection.

Moving inside, the primary revisions for the Superb are chrome highlights on the instrument panel and door trims, illuminated storage compartments, a digital insturment cluster display, updated infotainment systems, along with new upholstery options depending on the selected trim level – Ambition, Style, Sportline, and Laurin & Klement (L&K).

The L&K is considered the top trim level available to customers, and is available with an Alcantara roof lining, dedicated trim pieces and panels, trim-specific lettering and a Canton sound system. Additionally, it also gets chrome details on the exterior to make it out from a standard Superb.

Skoda also noted the Superb comes with “Simply Clever” solutions to make it more practical, adding on wireless phone charger and a Space Organiser below the false boot floor for the Combi model.

The latter can be supplemented with what it calls a Flexible Organiser to better partition the available boot space. Speaking of which, the Combi (and Scout) offers between 660 to 1,950 litres of cargo space, and the sedan between 625 to 1,760 litres.

Engine options include three diesel TDI and three petrol TSI powerplants, all of which meet the Euro 6d-TEMP emissions standard. The TDI camp consists of the 1.6 litre (120 PS), 2.0 litre Evo (150 PS) and another 2.0 litre TDI (190 PS, 400 Nm) unit,

As for the petrol options, they include a 1.5 litre (150 PS) and a 2.0 litre in two states of tune (190 PS and 272 PS, 350 Nm). Available transmissions for these engines are a six-speed manual or seven-speed dual-clutch DSG, with all-wheel drive being an option (standard for the Scout) in place of the standard front-wheel drive.

For those who want something even more Earth-friendly, there’s the Superb iV that comes with a plug-in hybrid powertrain. The system consists of a 1.4 litre TSI engine (156 PS), an electric motor (115 PS or 85 kW), a 13 kWh lithium-ion battery and six-speed DSG.

The total system output here is 218 PS and 400 Nm, with three drive modes on tap – Sport, E-mode and Hybrid. When running on electricity alone, the WLTP-rated range is up to 55 km, and up to 850 km when the petrol engine is brought into action.

Recharging the battery with a will take three and a half hours when the vehicle is plugged into a 3.6-kW wall box via the Type 2 connector located at the front grille. A smartphone app allows for pre-conditioning and other telematic functions to be performed.

There are some compromises with the plug-in hybrid model, and that is a smaller boot capacity due to the battery’s position on the chassis floor, just ahead of the rear axle. In the case of the sedan, the figure is down to 485 litres (with all seats in their normal position), and 510 litres in the estate.