Ferrari has finally taken the veils off the new F8 Spider, which essentially is a successor to the 488 Spider and a drop-top version of the F8 Tributo. The Italian automaker said the new midship Spider is slightly less extreme than the 488 Pista Spider (the F8 Spider is only 20 kg heavier), but sportier than the 488 Spider nonetheless.

Power comes from the familiar 3.9 litre dry-sump turbocharged V8 engine, producing 720 PS at 8,000 rpm (redline) and 770 Nm of torque at 3,250 rpm. All that is sent to the rear wheels through a seven-speed dual-clutch F1 gearbox, enabling the F8 Spider to sprint from zero to 100 km/h in 2.9 seconds, 0-200 km/h in 8.2 seconds, and a top speed of 340 km/h.

With 720 PS at its disposal, the F8 Spider has 50 PS more than the 488 Spider, courtesy of a new intake line that’s taken straight off the 488 Challenge. The intakes are moved to the rear on either side of the spoiler, and are directly connected to the intake plenums. This drastically reduces losses and ensures greater air flow to the engine, thereby increasing power. The air flow also benefits from increased dynamic pressure created by the shape of the rear spoiler.

Also, the turbocharged engine has been tuned to provide zero turbo lag, allowing instantaneous acceleration at any speed and gear. Included in the package is the new Ferrari Dynamic Enhancer (FDE+, activated in Race mode), which is designed to make the car easier to control at the limit. Adaptive Performance Launch is standard, as is Ferrari Variable Torque Management which delivers a consistently smooth, powerful acceleration to the redline.

The V8 engine benefits from titanium con-rods, crankshaft and flywheel, a move which Ferrari claims to allow engine speed to rise “very rapidly.” In total, 18 kg has been shaved off the engine, yielding a 17% inertia reduction relative to the rotating masses. A lightweight exhaust manifold with gasoline particulate filter taken from the 488 Challenge also reduced 9.7 kg of weight, and its layout has been modified to produce a sound that is “absolutely unique” to the F8 Spider.

Onto the design. The overall shape is still distinctly similar to the F8 Tributo, save for areas that support the retractable hard top design. The top itself takes 14 seconds to deploy or retract, and is operable at speeds of up to 45 km/h. The folding mechanism is divided into two parts and stowed on top of the engine.

The engine cover is one of the F8 Spider’s most distinctive styling traits, featuring a manta-like look with a central spine that starts from the rear screen and disappears under the wing of the spoiler. Other than that, both the F8 Tributo and F8 Spider look identical, even right down to wheel sizes (with mixed, fatter rear tyres) and design selection.

The cabin is virtually identical as well. It only seats two, obviously, and comes with an aluminium sail panel, some carbon-fibre trimmings, and the optional seven-inch passenger-side touchscreen display. The instrument cluster continues to feature the classic central rev-counter.

Currently, there’s no word on pricing, but each purchase comes with the complimentary seven-year scheduled maintenance programme. So, what do you think of the new Ferrari F8 Spider? Yay, or nay?

GALLERY: Ferrari F8 Tributo