Having already been shown in leaked photos earlier this year, the Geometry C appears set for an official reveal soon, as these teaser sketches hint. The second model from Geely’s electric vehicle sub-brand was due to be shown at Auto China in Beijing this month, but the coronavirus pandemic put paid to that.

As we’ve previously seen, the Geometry C will take the form of a C-segment hatchback with some black body cladding for a more crossover-like look, although the sketches suggest a far taller ride height than on the actual car. The car sports numerous design cues from the Geometry A sedan, such as the slim LED headlights with “tails”, the lack of an upper grille and an upswept window line.

However, the front fascia is a little bit sportier, with a downturned centre air intake flanked by two vertical inlets (there’s no more concentric ring design). The shoulder line also sweeps downwards towards the rear wheels, contrasting with the separate character line lower down. The D-pillars has been blacked out, as well, giving the car the all-important “floating roof” look.

Moving to the rear of the car, the Geometry C features another in-vogue styling cue – full-width tail lights. One can also spot the nicely integrated tailgate spoiler and a large diffuser-like bumper insert holding the rear fog light. Inside, expect the hatch to mirror the sedan closely, which should mean a massive 12.3-inch freestanding centre display, a small instrument screen and a tall floating centre console.

The Geometry C should also inherit the A’s electric powertrain, consisting of a single front-mounted permanent synchronous magnet motor developing 120 kW (161 hp) and 250 Nm of torque. All this is enough to propel the sedan to 100 km/h in 8.8 seconds, while a ternary lithium battery in 51.9 kWh and 61.9 kWh variants provides the A with a range of either 410 km or 500 km on the NEDC cycle. As the hatch looks to be of a similar size, the figures shouldn’t deviate too much.

There are currently no plans to bring the Geometry brand to Malaysia, although that could change if the country has the necessary charging infrastructure and the incentives to make the cars competitive in the local market. Would you want to see this car come to Malaysia? Sound off in the comments after the jump.