Volvo has announced that its range of 90 and 60 Series models, which are based on the Scalable Product Architecture (SPA), are now equipped with its new Advanced Air Cleaner (AAC) technology. First appearing on the S90 facelift earlier this year, the system is aimed at allowing drivers to breathe clean and healthy air inside their cars and clean the air of their cabin ahead of their journey.

The AAC is the result of a collaboration between Volvo and Blueair, and is part of the CleanZone system used in Volvo cars. It includes a sensor that measures PM 2.5 (particles smaller than 2.5 microns) levels inside the cabin, along with a synthetic fibre-based filter and high-voltage ioniser.

In operation, particles entering from the outside are ionised before being picked up by the filter. However, should the air outside be too polluted, the system will stop its supply and activate recirculation and purification of the air inside the cabin. Volvo says that up to 95% of all PM 2.5 particles are kept out of the cabin thanks to the AAC.

The carmaker adds that PM 2.5 is a widely-used measure for air quality, with many urban areas suffering from PM 2.5 values that exceeds recommended levels by the World Health Organisation. By optimising air quality inside the car, the company hopes to limit the adverse health effects that are associated with air pollution and fine particulates. Moreover, cleaner air helps to promote safe driving, as healthy and fresh air can help boost driver concentration.

With the Volvo On Call smartphone app, drivers of relevant models are also able to bring up the actual PM 2.5 levels inside their cars and easily schedule an extra cleaning of the cabin air ahead of their journey. This is in addition to existing functions like vehicle telemetry and pre-conditioning.

“With our Advanced Air Cleaner technology, you can rest assured that the air you breathe inside your Volvo is cleaner and healthier,” said Anders Lofvendahl, senior technical expert on cabin air quality at Volvo Cars. “We believe that clean air is good for you, both from a health and from a safety perspective, and will continue to push the envelope in this area,” he added.

The Swedish carmaker is also focused on creating a healthy environment inside its cars by removing emissions from organic substances inside the car, as well as reducing the amount of allergy-causing materials. As a result, strict sourcing requirements are placed on suppliers to minimise the generation and emission of odours from parts and materials used inside the cabin.

A special team of odour assessors, internally known as The Noses, are also employed to tests components individually as well as on a complete car level for odour emissions. Despite technological advances, this team remains unmissable for the odour control process as the human nose is much more sensitive than any analytical instrument, it adds.