Honda has set out its plan to increase its electric vehicle (EV) and fuel cell electric vehicle (FCV) model line-up in major markets of electrification, such as the United States and China, to 40% by 2030. This will then be expanded to 80% by 2035, and then to 100% globally by 2040.

This intent was announced by Honda president and CEO Toshihiro Mibe in his inaugural press conference earlier today. Mibe, who was appointed to the position in February, had previously stated that the automaker would be undergoing a “major transformation at great speed,” and the latest announcement expands on the automaker’s original plan of having EVs, hybrids and FCVs making up two-thirds of its sales by 2030.

Other technology plans and product timelines were also revealed or reiterated in his presentation. For the US, this will include the introduction of two large EV models as 2024 model year offerings, one under a Honda badge, and the other as an Acura. The models are being jointly developed with General Motors and will utilise the American automaker’s Ultium batteries.

From the second half of the decade, the company will launch a series of new EV models in the US, which will be underpinned by its new e:Architecture global modular EV platform, which is expected to be used in a variety of body-styles ranging from crossovers to sedans. Following their debut there, these will then be introduced to other markets worldwide.

In China, the automaker is set to introduce 10 Honda-brand EV models within five years. The first of the 10 models will be the series production version of the SUV e:prototype that was unveiled at Auto Shanghai earlier this week. The all-electric model is scheduled to go on sale in spring 2022.

In Japan, the EV/FCV penetration rate is set a little lower than the US and China, at 20% by 2030, but the deployment scale for 2035 (80%) and 2040 (100%) follows the global timeline. Additionally, with the aid of hybrids, Honda says it is planning to electrify 100% of its sales in Japan by 2030, indicating when purely petrol engined versions are set to ride off into the sunset.

It added that its first all-electric kei-car is due in 2024, and the middle of the decade will also see the introduction of the Cruise Origin, an electric self-driving vehicle aimed at the mobility services (MaaS) segment. Joint development work with GM and Cruise is ongoing, and testing in scheduled to begin in Japan from this year.

Elsewhere, the automaker said that research on the next-generation of solid-state batteries – which are set to offer high capacity and low cost – is being accelerated, with the intention of having these in its new models from the second half of the decade.

The company added that it will remain proactive in promoting the utilisation of hydrogen and fuel cell systems by expanding its FCV model lineup and also by using fuel cell systems for a wide range of applications, including commercial trucks as well as both stationary and movable power sources.