Maserati is entering a new era at the moment, as suggested by its most recent product roadmap, and an announcement that all of new models will either be electrified or be fully electric. In light of this transformation, the Italian carmaker is bidding farewell to one of its most memorable cars, the GranTurismo and GranCabrio, with production of both models coming to an end at the company’s Modena plant.

To celebrate the last day of production of the GT model on November 11, Maserati has created the one-off GranTurismo Zéda, which serves as an expression of the company’s transformation. According to the carmaker, the transition in colours from blue to black and finally white serves as a “bridge” that connects the past, the present and the future of the marque.

Even the name – Zéda – means “Z” in the Modena dialect, and pays tribute to Maserati’s roots and as a reminder that there is a new beginning for every ending. That new beginning involves renovating the Modena facility, which will see the construction of a new sports car model that is scheduled to launch in 2020.

The yet-to-be-revealed sports car is likely to be the heavily rumoured Alfieri, although Maserati has confirmed it will not give up on the GranTurismo and GranCabrio. Instead, a new generation of both models will arrive in 2021 and 2022, with production set to be shifted to the company’s Turin manufacturing hub.

It’s been a long road for the GranTurismo, as the model was first presented at the 2007 Geneva Motor Show as the modern interpretation of the classic A6 1500 of 1947 before being joined by a convertible version (GranCabrio) in 2009.

Along the way, the Maserati was given a number of updates, including a larger-displacement, Ferrari-sourced 4.7 litre V8, which was an improvement over the initial 4.2 litre unit. High performance MC versions were also introduced, along with the option for a ZF six-speed automatic gearbox in place of the six-speed sequential robotised transmission.

The final updates for both body styles were for the 2018 model year, which included subtle styling revisions, new equipment and a streamlined variant line-up that featured the Sport and the MC. The V8 continued to be of service, providing 460 PS (454 hp) at 7,000 rpm and 520 Nm of torque at 4,750 rpm, with a 0-100 km/h sprint time of 4.8 seconds (299 km/h top speed) for the Sport, while the lightweight MC will do the same a fraction quicker at 4.7 seconds (301 km/h top speed).