The new inline-six diesel engine which powers the Genesis GV80 could also go into the future Hyundai pick-up truck, Car Sales reported. “(For) this engine, we can have so many applications. (Hyundai) also make commercial vehicles and so on, so this engine will be out there for quite some time,” Hyundai R&D chief Albert Biermann told the Australian website.

This suggests that the new inline-six diesel will almost certainly be employed for powering other models that the engine can be fitted to, as the company will want to maximise its returns after the development of a new engine. Is it a confirmation that it will go into vehicles outside the Genesis banner, though? “We have not finally decided yet,” Biermann said.

In the Genesis GV80, the turbodiesel straight-six produces 278 PS and 600 Nm of torque; if installed in the forthcoming Hyundai pick-up truck in the same state of tune, this would endow it with more power and torque than the Mercedes-Benz X 350 d, which has 258 hp and 550 Nm of torque, and the Volkswagen Amarok 3.0 TDI, which has 258 hp and 580 Nm of torque in its most potent guise.

Though previously the X-Class was rumoured to have a V8 variant in development, such a model is less likely because this mid-sized pick-up segment is predominantly focused on four-cylinder variants, and the X-Class range as a whole was reportedly due to be dropped from Mercedes-Benz’s product line-up.

Hyundai chose to develop an inline-six diesel because it is inherently refined, and the longitudinal layout posed no packaging problems in the GV80, just as it wouldn’t be an issue in a large commercial vehicles, Biermann said. “It just makes the smoothest power. We developed the car from the beginning – the new platform (which will underpin the next G80 sedan) was already considered with that engine,” he said.

That the GV80 is bound for the European market with the diesel six-cylinder engine shows that Hyundai wants to spread the engine’s development costs over the widest possible range of applications, the Australian website noted, and Biermann confirmed that the GV80 will meet Euro 6 ‘Step II’ emissions regulations.

“There was a time, two years ago, when everybody was saying ‘diesel is over’, but now you have people saying: ‘with this new diesel technology, the air that comes from the tailpipe is cleaner than the air (the engine) sucks in, right?’ It is like that with the next level, so will it die or not die? Time will tell,” Biermann said regarding the viability of diesel in Europe.

Regardless of the outlook for diesel, Hyundai is ready, along with hybrid, mild hybrid, PHEV, fully electric as well as fuel-cell models in development, Biermann said, also adding that the 3.0 litre inline-six diesel is compatible with hybrid drive, though he did not elaborate further.

With Genesis head William Lee stating that the luxury brand will skip hybrids and head directly to EVs, hybrid drive applications for the diesel inline-six appears to be focused outside the Genesis brand, which adds weight to the idea of this powertrain going into other future Hyundai models.