Proton Iriz R5 brochure revealed; tarmac and gravel kits, running costs detailed – priced from RM776,000

Proton Iriz R5 brochure revealed; tarmac and gravel kits, running costs detailed – priced from RM776,000

Rally outfit Mellors Elliot Motorsport (MEM) had previously stated that there has been plenty of interest in the Iriz R5 rally car that it has been developing, and now the firm has released pricing details for its rally car that is homologated for competition in both left- and right-hand-drive layouts.

The sales brochure released by MEM on its Facebook page states that the Iriz R5 is priced from GBP140,000 (RM776,000) in base specification, and it includes costs for an options pack, a gravel kit and a tarmac kit, as well as a parts list and estimated running costs.

A base car starts in ‘ready to race’ tarmac trim, where it comes painted and is outfitted with aluminium wheels measuring 18 x 8 inches, tarmac comptetition tyres that are eligible for rallies, front and rear brake master cylinder, brake calipers including spacers, 355 mm front brake discs and 300 mm rear brake discs including bells and fixing rings. The tarmac kit costs GBP23,500 (RM130,222) when purchased separately.

Proton Iriz R5 brochure revealed; tarmac and gravel kits, running costs detailed – priced from RM776,000

Also included are driver and co-driver competition seats, six-point HANS-compatible harnesses, a competition steering wheel, FIA-approved fire extinguisher system, and front and rear underbody protection.

An options pack is available for GBP45,000 (RM249,362) , and this buys you a Cosworth co-driver’s display, a data handling kit including a laptop with Cosworth software, data key and download cable, full United Kingdom registration, a central guard for exhaust and propshaft protection, a differential guard, front side stone guards and larger-diameter 355 mm rear brake discs including bells.

Also part of the options kit are Winmax tarmac brake pads developed for the Iriz R5, and FIA fuel sample kit, Michelin competition tyres, map light including loom, driver’s footrest, navigator’s footrest including buttons, a roof vent kit, a helmet net, a spare wheel kit including wheel, tyre, wheel tray and strap, wheel brace and a digital Stilo intercom.

Click to enlarge

In addition to the options package, there are more components that can be purchased separately, such as a heated windscreen (GBP400/RM2,215), brake balance adjuster (GBP120/RM665), lighting kit including a six-light bonnet lamp assembly, left- and right-hand-side corner light assemblies (GBP4,850/RM26,879), anti-glare dashboard coating (GBP120/RM665) and more.

Also available are quick-release drybreak hydraulic connector kits for brakes, clutch, gearbox, rear differential, handbrake release and steering, as well as carbon-fibre mirrors and a mudflap kit.

For customers who are planning to enter their Iriz R5 into gravel rally events, the available gravel kit is priced at GBP19,900 (RM110,397), and this is comprised of a gravel-spec damper assembly, steering arm, outer TCA pin, pin nut and retainer, outer gravel track rod mount, gravel brake discs, disc retaining rings, gravel-spec compound Winmax brake pads, rear wheel scraper assembly, rear wheel stone guard, gravel track rod spacers, gravel brake caliper mounting pins and a set of 15×7-inch Speedline gravel wheels.

Proton Iriz R5 brochure revealed; tarmac and gravel kits, running costs detailed – priced from RM776,000

The brochure also includes estimated running costs for the Iriz R5 – click on the document pages to see them in detail. Among these is an engine rebuild every 2,000 km, which costs GBP8,000 or RM44,338 for each interval. The brochure also lists the components by category (engine, transmission, steering and so forth), part cost, action required and mileage.

Mellors Elliot Motorsport began developing the Iriz R5 rally car in 2016, and it is powered by a 4B11T engine from the Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution, albeit in reduced capacity from 2.0 litres to 1.6 litres to comply with R5 rally regulations. Also in order to comply with R5 regulations is the fitment of a 32 mm intake restrictor, which limits outputs to around 350 hp and 450 Nm of torque.

Transmission comes courtesy of a five-speed Xtrac sequential manual gearbox and all-wheel-drive with Xtrac front and rear differentials, and suspension is by Reiger three-way adjustable units with external reservoir dampers and hydraulic bump stops. Braking employs Brembo components, and Cosworth provides the electronics suite. Fuel is contained in an 80-litre Advanced Fuel Systems fuel cell.

Proton Iriz R5 brochure revealed; tarmac and gravel kits, running costs detailed – priced from RM776,000

The R5 category replaced the PWRC category in 2012, along with the S2000 and WRC2 categories of the time. The governing body, FIA aimed for R5 to be a more accessible category for more entrants by placing a cost cap for key components and the overall vehicle, and required constructors to create a customer racing support programme.

The R5 category rally cars are versatile too, as they are also eligible for the European Rally Championship (ERC) and WRC qualifying rounds such as the British Rally Championship (BRC). R5-specification cars may also compete in the Asia Pacific Rally Championship (APRC) in the AP4 category.

Here at paultan.org, we’ve followed the development of the MEM-built Iriz R5 with interest, and we got to uncover some interesting facts on the rally car courtesy of founder and team principal Chris Mellors. We’ve also delved into the technical intricacies of why its engine was chosen. What do you think, dear readers? Is this the rally car you’ve been waiting for?

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Mick Chan

Open roads and closed circuits hold great allure for Mick Chan. Driving heaven to him is exercising a playful chassis on twisty paths; prizes ergonomics and involvement over gadgetry. Spent three years at a motoring newspaper and short stint with a magazine prior to joining this website.

 

Comments

  • panjang on Aug 19, 2020 at 3:31 pm

    I like the maintenance details…Road car should be sold with those details provided as reference.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 12 Thumb down 2
  • Donno on Aug 19, 2020 at 3:51 pm

    This will have a little bearing on lifting the status of the sport of rallying in Malaysia. Right now rallying is practically dead for nearly 2 years already!

    Proton, Perodua, MAM.

    Support grassroot rallying by having a one make novice cup. A single make class of say Axia or Iriz with full safety equipments for less than RM50k.

    We need to have our Malaysian Rally Championship up and about again as soon as possible.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 21 Thumb down 1
    • donno on Aug 20, 2020 at 4:03 pm

      okay lets get back to the car, the Iriz R5.

      At that price point, you would only get a used Fiesta or Fabia R5. For new rally cars, that is actually arround the price of the Oreca R4 cars, which is going to be slower than cars build to full R5 specs.

      With known (for us malaysians) Mitsubishi based engine (not the Peugeot/Price engine on the Oreca R4), it would be more acceptable to Asia Pacific rallyists.

      As for Proton motorsport, i don’t see them going to or willing to take the advantage of a ready Proton R5 rally car to be used as a marketing tool, and to bring up and coming malaysian young drivers into the sport. Grooming young drivers need more steps below the R5 and international competitions, and this is also something we need to invest in. Lower rung competitions to unearth young talents. Motorcycle racing thrives in malaysia as youngsters have structured steps to progress. Starting from minibikes, to cubprix wira class, novice, expert, then into Asia Pacific road racing championship. Rallying (and 4 wheel racing generally) in Malaysia needs an ecosystem like the motorcycle racing has right now in malaysia.

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 0
    • Brian on Aug 20, 2020 at 5:16 pm

      Iriz aldy 50k so where is the cost for those rally spec upgrades?

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0
      • donno on Aug 21, 2020 at 10:07 am

        A basic spec Iriz manual is about RM36K. If a batch of rally base car with all the interior amenities, aircon, ABS, airbags, alloy rims is not installed, that could be produced for less than RM30k.

        Add on FIA spec bolt-in rollcages, fire extinguishers basic upgraded absorbers, underbody protections, mudpflaps for RM20k all in and you really can have an Iriz rally car for RM50K

        Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 1
        • Brian on Aug 21, 2020 at 4:06 pm

          If you follow the build progress, this isn’t some standard Iriz chassis taken of Tg Malim. There is some some added chassis magic like double body welds and clearing the floorpan to fit 4WD. You won’t get that for a mere 50k, my friend.

          Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 13
          • Donno on Aug 24, 2020 at 1:05 pm

            I am talking about a bare bones Iriz rally car for local use. That we can build a basic rally car with the Iriz for less than RM50K. Not the Iriz in the main article!

            That full blown R5 rally car is of course RM700++ K.

            Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 1
  • forgive me but… i laugh my ass out looking at the price and the name Proton Iriz

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 9 Thumb down 55
    • Maybe because you don’t know what R5 means…

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 28 Thumb down 1
    • dream_125 on Aug 19, 2020 at 6:14 pm

      RM776,000 is very cheap for a real racing car?

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 10 Thumb down 0
      • Chris Ong on Aug 19, 2020 at 9:47 pm

        Yes. 776K for a full racing capable car is cheap.
        A road legal race ready 911 GT3 is 2M.
        Full track prepared is more than that.

        Like or Dislike: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 0
    • Brian on Aug 20, 2020 at 9:55 am

      A full WRC race ready Iriz R5 with all the options for tarmac would cost RM 1.2mil, yeah the most expensive Proton you could buy but you know what. That is C-H-E-A-P in comparison to WRC prepped cars from other makers.

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 9 Thumb down 0
    • Heng Lee on Aug 20, 2020 at 5:33 pm

      “Proton Iriz R5 takes hattrick of UK wins with Malton Rally victory”

      I’m quite sure that the competitors cannot laugh at all… ;)

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 0
    • Brian on Aug 21, 2020 at 4:07 pm

      I forgive you… for not knowing what is R5 Rally racing about and why the car is that expensive.

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0
  • Haidi on Aug 19, 2020 at 5:15 pm

    Oh yea! 1.6L turbocharged 4B11. On the other hand, it remind us that EVO is dead… Sad…

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 0
  • haha…

    Myvi be like…..

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 4
  • Amin Sukor on Aug 20, 2020 at 8:02 am

    Waste time and money for this iriz r5

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 17
    • EDITOR on Aug 21, 2020 at 10:37 am

      Wasted your time commenting on something you don’t understand nor comprehend at all?

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 10 Thumb down 0
      • lumioka on Aug 25, 2020 at 4:08 pm

        He probably only pieced the word “Proton” and RM766k onli and not realizing it’s a WRC car, not the ones you see on the road.

        Opcos a race car is expensive leh. They’re custom build for that purpose.

        Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0
  • myvi r5 berape bang?

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 2
  • KL Lee on Aug 20, 2020 at 9:06 am

    I’m fainted when look at the estimated running cost RM134/km (24.5pound/km), meaning my one way back to my hometown (distance: 100km) will cost me RM13,400.00 (excluding petrol & toll)…

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0
    • Brian on Aug 21, 2020 at 10:42 am

      OTOH this car will cut your travel distance by going thru a straight line back to your hometown. How? This is a off-road rally car after all. It goes thru obstacles.

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0
  • Owai are the comments all about too expensive to run?
    Its a freaking race car la, not car for daily drive or balik kampung.
    What are u ppl thinking??

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 9 Thumb down 0
    • Brian on Aug 21, 2020 at 4:09 pm

      These people are thinking Bezza is the better car because of rated 21km/L FC which only exist in lab test.

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 0
 

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