Singaporeans owe Polis Diraja Malaysia (PDRM) over RM30 million in unpaid summonses. The sum is from 108,798 saman issued since 2016 till March this year.

According to Bukit Aman traffic and enforcement department (JSPT) deputy director SAC Datuk Mohd Nadzri Hussain, the main offence is speeding, which made up 7,371 of the summonses, or 5.1% of the total, Kosmo reported. That’s followed by queue jumping (3,950), ignoring traffic signs (1,309), not wearing seatbelts (1,309) and jumping traffic lights (761). Other summonses were issued for fancy plates, accidents, obstruction and brake lamps.

He added that PDRM has the power to arrest Singapore nationals that have Pol.170A summonses and then change the status to notis saman Pol.257 with a date of trial. The difference is that Pol.170A summonses are not issued face-to-face. If one was stopped by a cop, who then issued a saman directly, that would be Pol.257.

Mohd Nadzri added that Singaporeans with unpaid summonses can be stopped from leaving Malaysia. If they fail to present themselves in court, arrest warrants could be issued. “Among the problems we have in tracking down the traffic offenders is the lack of address. We do not have access to because of jurisdiction,” the cop said, adding that without addresses, the Pol.170A summonses cannot be mailed to the offenders.

Summonses can be paid online and at kiosks in Singapore, although not many are doing so, judging by the headline figures. Mohd Nadzri welcomed JPJ’s move to register foreign vehicles via the Vehicle Entry Permit (VEP) and Road Charge (RC) system, which will be enforced at borders in the near future. He said that with registration of incoming vehicles in place, PDRM will be able to mail out Pol.170A summonses to Singaporeans.