You read that right – Honda’s luxury offshoot Acura has confirmed that its forthcoming Integra will be offered with a six-speed manual gearbox! The company has been leaning onto its sporty heritage by resurrecting the hallowed nameplate and a sporty design, and now it looks like the car will have the hardware to back it up.

Acura broke the news in the most soul-stirring way possible – a video showing a driver rowing through the gears in four different generations of the Integra (including an Acura RSX Type S, known to you and me as the DC5 Integra), before ending up in the new model. It’s music to the ears (literally) of any enthusiast.

This is the first time we’re seeing the actual car (the previous images have been renders), so we can glean quite a bit from the film. The gearlever is topped with a leather-wrapped metal – or at least metal-like – knob, flanked on the driver’s side by a row of buttons that include a drive mode selector, an electronic parking brake switch and an Individual button to call up the driver’s preferred settings.

We already know that Acura will eschew the traditional two-door body style in favour of a five-door fastback (the Integra has been available with a four-door option for most of its life). The new model will also carry the brand’s latest design language, sporting slim headlights and a five-point grille while rocking Integra-imprinted front and rear bumpers that hark back to the popular third-generation model.

It’s still not known if the new Integra will be sold in the rest of the world (wearing the familiar Honda badge) or if it will remain a North America-exclusive model. However, the fact that it will be developed in Japan – rather than at Acura’s headquarters in the US – means that there is a distinct possibility. Honda has raised doubts, however, by using the nameplate on an entirely different mildly-redesigned Civic in China.

Whichever way it turns out, Acura’s Integra will be based on the new 11th-generation Civic and will be the most affordable model in the brand’s lineup. It’s also expected to derive some of its components with the also-upcoming Type R, although a high-performance Type S variant won’t be offered, at least at launch.

Over to you now – what do you think of the new Integra, and would you like to see it sold here as a Honda? Sound off in the comments after the jump.