This is it – Hyundai Sime Darby Malaysia (HSDM) has officially started its teaser campaign for the seventh-generation Elantra sedan, signalling its intent to field the all-new C-segment sedan here. It will be a tough fight, going against direct rivals like the Honda Civic, Toyota Corolla, and Mazda 3.

There are no details to go with the teaser – no specifications, estimated launch date, nor ballpark price figures have been circulating just yet. It’s not even clear if the Elantra will be locally assembled or fully imported, and whether or not it will be launched during the sales tax-free period.

So, let’s talk about the Elantra. As you can tell from the face, the seventh-gen sedan wears Hyundai’s new Sensuous Sportiness design language, and it’s the second car to wear the look after the recently-launched Sonata. The end result is a look that is distinctly different from the usual suspects, but whether or not it appeals to the masses is a different story altogether.

The new Elantra is bigger than its predecessor in every way, with wheelbase stretched by 20 mm (2,720 mm), the body wider by 25 mm (1,826 mm), and height lowered by 20 mm (1,415 mm). It’s also nearly 56 mm longer in terms of overall length, now measuring 4,676 mm. That makes it longer than the Corolla, Mazda 3, and Honda Civic, although it’s worth noting that the Elantra sits as low as the Civic.

Design-wise, Hyundai says the car looks almost like “geometric crystals.” Like the Sonata, it features sharp lines and deep creases, including the massive Cascading Grille with “Parametric jewel-pattern.” The grille connects the LED headlights (with LED DRLs), and the lower apron design is more prominent compared to the outgoing model.

The doors feature the controversial Z-shaped impression, while the rear gets LED combination tail lights with an adjoining strip – just like the Sonata. There’s an integrated spoiler as well, and wheel sizes range from 15 to 17 inches.

Inside, the cabin is said to be more spacious than before, and it features a two-spoke steering wheel and digital instrument meter. Hyundai calls this the “Immersive Cocoon” interior layout, designed specifically to envelop the driver like an airplane cockpit. If you’ve seen the Sonata, you roughly know what to expect.

Depending on the variant, the Elantra can be had with twin 10.25-inch displays, one for the instrumentation and the other for the infotainment. The latter is angled slightly towards the driver, and offers wireless Apple CarPlay and Android Auto support (first for its segment, Hyundai claims). There’s also a smaller eight-inch display with wireless Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, but we know which one Malaysians prefer.

Other goodies include a 64-colour LED mood lighting system, a cornering grab handle for the front passenger, voice-recognition system, and options such as a Qi wireless smartphone charging tray, Blue Link Connected Car System, and eight-speaker Bose premium sound system with Super65 wide-range speakers in the front doors and a woofer at the back.

For the powertrain, base models are powered with the 2.0L MPI Atkinson Cycle engine, generating 147 horsepower at 6,200 rpm and 179 Nm of torque at 4,500 rpm. An Intelligent Variable Transmission (IVT; essentially a CVT), which drives the front wheels, is standard.

There’s also the Elantra Hybrid sold in other markets. This gets a smaller 1.6 litre GDI Atkinson-cycle four-cylinder petrol engine that’s augmented with a 32 kW electric motor. Total output is 139 hp and 264 Nm of torque, while a six-speed dual-clutch auto is standard. A 1.32 kWh lithium-ion-polymer battery, positioned under the rear seats, powers the motor.

Above that is the Elantra N Line (pictured below) with a 1.6 litre turbocharged GDI petrol engine that produces 201 hp and 264 Nm of torque. Customers get to choose from a six-speed manual or seven-speed dual-clutch transmission, with drive sent exclusively to the front wheels. The range will be crowned by the Elantra N that’s set to be unveiled soon.

Safety-wise, the car can be had with Hyundai SmartSense. Features include Forward Collision-Avoidance Assist (FCA) with Pedestrian Detection, Lane Keeping Assist (LKA), Lane Following Assist (LFA), High Beam Assist (HBA), Driver Attention Warning (DAW), and rear view camera with dynamic guidelines.

Optional systems include Blind-Spot Collision Avoidance Assist (BCA) with Rear Cross-Traffic Collision-Avoidance Assist (RCCA), Smart Cruise Control (SCC), Highway Driving Assist (HDA; helps keep the car centred within lane), Safe Exit Warning (SEW), as well as Reverse Parking Collision Avoidance Assist (PCA) with pedestrian and obstacle detection.

So there you have it, a quick recap of the all-new Hyundai Elantra. What do you think of it? Do you like the way it looks? Comment, below.

GALLERY: 2021 Hyundai Elantra

GALLERY: 2021 Hyundai Elantra N Line

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