As is to be expected when you sell a lot of cars, the aspect of after-sales can have trouble keeping up. Such is the case with Proton, which has been experiencing issues with its after-sales, with a lack of parts for both scheduled servicing and accident repairs causing unhappiness among customers.

While acknowledging that the issue is there and needs to be fixed, the automaker says it isn’t perturbed by the level of complaints, even if it is taking steps to address the problem. “From the way you read about it on social media, it seems very bad and because of that some potential customers are hesitating to buy a Proton, but for us it really isn’t that bad,” said Proton deputy CEO Roslan Abdullah.

“If you compare the volume of our sales to the number of complaints, we can count the number of these on social media,” he said during an interview last week. He said that while the noise from complaints is apparent, the majority of customers are happy, but remain silent.

Nonetheless, the company isn’t viewing the matter lightly. “Although I say it isn’t bad, we take it seriously on finding what is the root cause, what makes these customers unhappy, and what makes customers not get the parts on time or why the car is not being repaired properly,” he stated.

The national automaker has been taking steps to rectify the problems, with the latest being weekly ‘war room’ meetings – chaired by Proton CEO Li Chunrong – to discuss facets of after-sales and how to address the shortage in parts. According to Roslan, this includes ensuring that vendors deliver the parts, and that parts from Geely are also coming on time.

Earlier this month, Proton announced that it has implemented a mandatory requirement where all dealers are required to have at least three months holding stock of 22 fast moving parts. Expanding on this, Roslan said that the company was targeting to have adequate stock in place by the end of June, with adequate being three months stock at dealerships, three months of stock at its warehouses and also a certain number of months’ stock at its vendors.