Tesla is looking for a new location in central US, likely in Texas, to establish a new Gigafactory. Company CEO and founder Elon Musk took to Twitter to announce this, adding that the new manufacturing plant will be used to build the Cybertruck.

Musk later added that the Model Y will be manufactured on the east coast, indicating that there could be a third Gigafactory in the pipeline. Currently, Tesla’s sole Gigafactory in the US is in Fremont, California, where the company makes the Model S, 3, X and Y. It also has a battery plant in Nevada.

Why Texas for the Cybertruck, then? Well, Automotive News said it’s the top state for pickup sales in the country and home to General Motors’ and Toyota’s truck factories. With the Cybertruck, Tesla aims to take on the likes of the Ford F-150 and Chevrolet Silverado.

Just last week, Musk said that the production version of the Cybertruck may turn out to be better looking. It’s not clear how extensive the styling changes will be, but going by its prototype guise and ultra-hard stainless steel exterior shell, safety experts have doubts on how it will fare in crashes. This is because the hard shell is incapable of crumpling like the body of a regular car, which could pose a different set of dangers altogether.

Other additions include a payload towing calculator to inform owners how much goods they can carry, as well as active ride height and active damping that are “game-changing for a truck or any car with a high max/min weight ratio.”

As a refresher, there will be three variants of the Cybertruck on offer, starting with the Single Motor Rear-Wheel Drive, to Dual Motor All-Wheel Drive, and range-topping Tri Motor All-Wheel Drive. The top model is scheduled to go on sale in 2021 (a year earlier than Tesla had initially announced), while the entry-level model has been pushed back to late-2022. All models will get the Ultra-Hard 30X Cold-Rolled stainless-steel exterior body, which is 45% heavier but stronger than titanium.

It’s easy to imagine how hefty the Cybertruck will be, but Tesla says the entry-level model boasts as much as 400 km of driving range, with the top model getting up to 800 km on a full charge. The 0-60 mph (0-97 km/h) sprint is achieved in 2.9 seconds, a figure that can be reduced should Tesla choose to make a smaller truck.