Tesla CEO and founder, Elon Musk has revealed that the production spec Cybertruck will look “slightly better” than the Mars rover-esque concept that debuted last year. This follows a query posted on Twitter, asking if the overall look “will generally stay the same,” to which Musk simply said “it’s slightly better.”

However, it’s unclear how extensive the styling changes will be, and if the Cybertruck will still don the controversial exterior design at all. Several safety groups have voiced concerns of the truck’s design, stating that it had to be changed if it were to hit market. There are also questions pertaining to its stainless steel body and how it will fare in crashes – the hard shell is incapable of crumpling like the body of a regular car, which poses another set of dangers altogether.

Other than that, Musk also said the electric pick-up truck will get a payload towing calculator to inform owners how much goods they can carry relative to the driving scenario. There will also be “active ride height and active damping” that are “game-changing for a truck or any car with a high max/min weight ratio.”

Now, there will be three variants of the Cybertruck on offer, with the range-topping three-motor AWD version scheduled to go on sale in 2021, a year earlier than Tesla had initially announced. The most affordable single-motor RWD model, on the other hand, was pushed back to late-2022. All models will get the Ultra-Hard 30X Cold-Rolled stainless-steel exterior body, which is 45% heavier but stronger than titanium.

It’s easy to imagine how hefty the Cybertruck will be, but Tesla says the entry-level model boasts as much as 400 km of driving range, with the top model getting up to 800 km on a full charge. The 0-60 mph (0-97 km/h) sprint is achieved in 2.9 seconds, a figure that can be reduced should Tesla choose to make a smaller truck.

Speaking of which, Musk also said that in the longer run, “it probably makes sense to build a smaller Cybertruck.” Again, this was revealed on Twitter, after a user pleaded the automaker to build a junior-sized model so as to not “block his entire street.”