With the new-generation Land Rover Defender having already arrived, it’s time for the just as recognisable Discovery to receive its mid-lifecycle update. The fifth-generation Discovery is approaching four years of age, though along the way it has received engine and equipment upgrades as well.

The front end receives sparing changes, with the headlamps appearing to be carried over from the current model. The front bumper also appears to be the existing item, though the grille has been concealed on this development vehicle, and will therefore likely sport an update when it is eventually uncovered.

The aforementioned headlamps should therefore be also ripe for a new design, as will the tail lamp units, while the asymmetrical tail gate with its offset license plate mount also appears set to be carried over into the update. No close-up images of the revised Disco’s interior just yet, however a glimpse through the windows reveal some fabric shrouding atop the dashboard, suggesting updates are to be found here.

The mid-lifecycle update should bring some revisions to the powertrain line-up as well, where 48-volt electrical architecture is expected to appear and offer the basis of mild-hybrid engines as a result. This could mean the addition of the electrified 3.0 litre turbocharged petrol inline-six that produces 400 PS and 550 Nm of torque in both the Defender and Range Rover Sport HST.

The Discovery engine line-up currently includes the 2.0 litre Ingenium turbocharged petrol engine with 240 PS and 340 Nm of torque, while diesels come in the form of a 2.0 litre SD4 four-cylinder with 240 PS and 430 Nm of torque, while a 3.0 litre SD6 six-cylinder makes 306 PS and 700 Nm of torque.

Off-roading capability is paramount in a Land Rover product, and the facelifted Discovery is expected to at least retain the current model’s 900 mm water-wading depth, as well as its 3,500 kg towing capacity; figures which are identical to those of the latest Land Rover Defender.