Cadillac has unveiled the Lyriq fully electric crossover, after its debut was postponed from its original April 2 date due to the declaration of a health emergency in March after 14 people tested positive for the coronavirus in Los Angeles, where the debut was planned, in March.

The Cadillac Lyriq is based upon the firm’s third-generation modular electric vehicle platform, which offers the EV crossover greater range and better passenger space compared to an adaptation of an existing combustion engine platform, the American carmaker says.

This platform houses modular drive systems as well as the new Ultium family of drive batteries, and being an integral part of the architecture that contributes to its safety as well as ride and handling. The lower centre of gravity and a nearly-even 50:50 weight distribution courtesy of the battery pack’s placement results in “a vehicle that’s sporty, responsive and allows for spirited driving,” says Cadillac.

Electricity is stored in the Ultium battery system which offers 100 kWh in the Lyriq, and which can be charged at rates of over 150 kW with DC charging. This offers more than 300 miles (480 km) of driving range on a full charge, the automaker said.

Comprised of NCMA (nickel-cobalt-manganese-aluminum) chemistry, the battery uses aluminium in the cathode to reduce the amount the amount of rare earths used, and General Motors engineers have reduced cobalt content by 70% compared to GM’s current batteries.

The battery chemistry is packaged in large, flat pouch cells that reduces complexity and simplifies battery cooling needs, says the automaker. The battery’s electronics are incorporated directly into the modules, allowing the removal of nearly 90% of battery pack wiring compared to those in the company’s current EVs, said GM.

The Lyriq employs a primarily rear-wheel-drive layout, with optionally available all-wheel-drive in a higher performance version. The AWD version features an additional drive motor on the front axle, allowing for “a significant amount of tuning flexibility, enhancing vehicle dynamics and performance for drivers,” says Cadillac. The automaker has yet to release official performance details for the Lyriq.

A ‘choreographed lighting sequence’ in the Lyriq welcomes its occupants upon entering, at the same time preparing the cabin for the journey by making adjustments to the seats, mirrors and climate control. Featured on the dashboard is a 33-inch LED display which offers drive information, infotainment controls as well as camera views, and the display has the highest pixel density of any screen in the automotive industry today, as well as the ability to display over one billion colours, says Cadillac.

The screen will enable the driver to monitor the vehicle’s battery charging status, as well as forecasting its energy consumption and can provide charging suggestions. A new, dual-plane augmented reality-enhanced head-up display that offers information on two planes; a near plane displaying speed and direction of travel, and a far plane displaying transparent navigation signals and other alerts.

The Lyriq packs a number of assisted driving features. The crossover features the latest version of Super Cruise hands-free driver assistance feature, here including lane change on demand. Also featured is supervised remote parking, where ultrasonic sensors are employed to help the Lyriq park itself in parallel or perpendicular parking spaces, either with the driver in the vehicle, or outside.

A new road noise cancellation will feature for the first time in a Cadillac with the Lyriq, featuring accelerometers in addition to microphones in order to target the frequency range of tyre cavity noise that needs to be reduced for a quieter cabin, says Cadillac. This will come as part of a 19-speaker AKG Studio sound system that will be offered when the Lyriq goes to market.

As at March when the Lyriq was shown in concept form at GM’s EV Day, the electric crossover is reportedly 85% true to the production vehicle, where the concept featured 23-inch wheels and powered doors. Cadillac refers to this latest iteration of the Lyriq as a show car, which suggests it is rather closer to production readiness than a concept. The crossover remains some way off, however, as it told The Verge that it won’t enter production until ‘late 2022’, likely starting production in China before it does in the United States.