Announced almost two years ago, the Project Triumph TE-1 electric motorcycle (e-bike) has successfully completed phase two testing in its development cycle. Phase two for the Triumph TE-1 reveals the battery and powertrain prototype, which Triumph says develops the equivalent of almost 180 hp, but with the motor weighing only 10 kg.

A key objective of Project Triumph TE-1 is to develop advances in the e-bike’s overall weight, battery technology, and powertrain performance to meet targets set by the UK Automotive Council for 2025. To this end, Triumph has developed an all new advanced vehicle control software which incorporates all of the electrical systems, including throttle response, regenerative braking and traction control.

The project, spearheaded by Triumph, is in collaboration with Williams Advanced Engineering, Integral Powertrain Ltd and WMG at the University of Warwick, as well as the UK’s Office for Zero Emission Vehicles and Innovate UK, a government agency that supports business led research and development in the UK.

Chassis design and styling is by Triumph, with the goal of creating an e-bike that is optimised in the integration of the chassis, battery and motor components. Williams is responsible for the battery module layout and vehicle control unit that is integrated into the battery pack to minimise weight and reduce component size.

Project Triumph TE-1 is divided into four main phases, with the aim of developing joint expertise in the packaging and safety of batteries, optimum electric motor sizing and packaging, the integration of braking systems including regenerative braking, and advanced safety systems across the UK e-bike industry.

“Pulling all of this together with the partners we are thrilled to see the progress of such an exciting demonstration vehicle which incorporates the cutting-edge technology needed to guide the strategy for the future roadmap of electric motorcycles from Triumph,” said Steve Sargent, Triumph’s Chief Product Officer.