Mazda appears to be forging ahead with the development of a standalone premium two-seater sports car, according to patent filings from Japan sighted as shown by IP Force Japan. The patent filing image as seen above appears to show what could be under the skin of a potential, productionised RX-Vision concept, though patent filings are hardly confirmation that a technical drawing of a vehicle will make it to showrooms.

That said, the detail which these drawings go into suggest that the two-seater sports coupé is possibly more than a flight of fancy. There are actually several patent filings for Mazda’s sports coupé over the last two years, and the latest of which focuses on the rear section of the vehicle structure for its integrity in the event of a crash, and to minimise vibrations and noise.

These are described – through Google-translated passages of text – as an aluminium space frame that is designed to “ensure support rigidity of [the] rear suspension,” as well as to effectively transmit forces from a rear collision load “from a rear side housing (rigid member) to a joint or a side sill and pillar.”

Illustrations of Mazda sports coupé central section (top row) and rear structure. Click to enlarge

Given the intent of a two-seater sports car, improved rear-end rigidity adds to the driver appeal through attributes such as steering response, which is further augmented by rigidity in the mid-section of the chassis where the central “floor tunnel” is made from aluminium, and the rear section of the tunnel is made of magnesium and aluminium, according to the description accompanying the patent drawings.

The forward section of the vehicle appears to be just as sports car-oriented, with a large cross-member joining the front double-wishbone suspension layout. The front cross-member could also mean a weight distribution of close to 50:50 front to rear, as any internal combustion engine would have to be located entirely behind the front axle line.

Another diagram sighted by Autoblog suggests that a hybrid powertrain is on the cards, employing in-wheel motors for driving the front wheels. Powertrain details have not been described in these patent filings, though presentation slides from Mazda last year stated that electrification technologies currently being developed for the longitudinal engine platform include plug-in hybrid and 48-volt mild-hybrid powertrain combinations.

This engine is rumoured to be paired with an eight-speed automatic transmission for the next-generation Mazda 6, though the longitudinal layout of this sports coupé illustrated here may also suggest that powertrain’s possible fitment in the two-seater. There’s not been anything to indicate its confirmed application in the two-seater, mind.

Exciting times for fans of purpose-built sports car platforms. Should this design come to fruition and emerge as a proper production model, this will be one more to join the fray of RWD inline-six two-seater sports cars. It would be a nice addition, wouldn’t it?