Munich prosecutors have issued an administrative order against Audi for deviations from regulatory requirements in certain V6 and V8 diesel engines. The division of Volkswagen has accepted the 800 million euros fine, and the case is now closed, in Germany at least.

“Following thorough examination, Audi accepted the fine and it will not lodge an appeal against it. By doing so, Audi admits its responsibility for the deviations from regulatory requirements,” the company said in a statement.

According to the findings of the investigation carried out by the German public prosecutor, monitoring duties had been breached in the “emissions service and power engine approval” organizational unit in the company, which monitors vehicle regulatory conformity. These breaches were causes of certain V6 and V8 diesel developed by Audi not meeting regulatory requirements.

It was noted that Ingolstadt also failed to discover that EA288 (Gen3) engines in the USA and Canada and EA189 engines worldwide produced by Volkswagen were advertised, sold to customers, and placed on the market with an impermissible software function from 2004.

It’s a substantial fine, but Audi and VW would surely be glad that another dieselgate legal book has closed. The one time “special items” hit will see the company significantly undercut major financial key performance indicators forecasted for the fiscal year 2018.

In June, parent company Volkswagen was fined one billion euros in Germany for “impermissible software functions” in its TDI engines. Daimler, which makes Mercedes-Benz cars, is also in the same pot of hot diesel soup.