It’s no secret that Dyson is venturing into the electric vehicle market, and the latest news from multiple news sources, including BBC News, The Verge and Autocar, is that the British appliance maker has zeroed in on a production site – and it’s Singapore.

The company announced that board members have approved the construction of a “purpose-built advanced” manufacturing plant in the island state, which is set to be completed in 2020. In an email sent to Dyson employees, CEO Jim Rowan said that construction on the new facility will kick off in December.

Dyson, of course, is no stranger to building its products in Singapore, having opened a factory in Tuas in 2013 to produce its digital motors – its term for permanent-magnet synchronous electric motors, which many electric vehicles currently use – in its vacuum cleaners and hairdryers. The production of those products, meanwhile, had long moved from Malmesbury, Wiltshire to Malaysia – since 2002, in fact.

This latest decision would allow Dyson to leverage its existing supply network in the region. According to BBC News, the company insisted that not building the plant in Britain – despite founder James Dyson being a champion of the country’s decision to leave the European Union – had nothing to do with cost.

“Singapore also offers access to high-growth markets as well as an extensive supply chain and a highly skilled workforce,” said Rowan. “Singapore has a comparatively high cost base, but also great technology expertise and focus. It is therefore the right place to make high-quality technology-loaded machines, and the right place to make our electric vehicle.”

The plant is part of a £2.5 billion (RM13.5 billion) investment in the EV project, which will spawn a high-end, low-volume car in 2021 and two cheaper, mass-produced models later on. Dyson is already gearing up operations in anticipation of the cars’ impending launch, having opened its new technology campus at the former Royal Air Force base in Hullavington, Wiltshire that will also form its proving ground.