Volkswagen has released more details regarding the newly-unveiled ID.4 electric SUV. According to Karsten Schebsdat, company head of driving dynamics, steering and control systems, the ID.4 drives nearly as dynamically as the smaller ID.3 hatch.

For starters, the ID.4 is rear-wheel driven, and the high-voltage battery pack between the axles is positioned at the lowest point of the car. Doing so lowers the car’s centre of gravity and improves the car’s handling. Dual-motor all-wheel drive variants, meanwhile, boast a 50:50 weight distribution.

For suspension, the front axle gets McPherson struts, while the rear is managed by a new, more complex five-link setup that is elastically connected to the body. The optional Dynamic Chassis Control provides four drive modes – Eco, Comfort, Sport and Individual, each altering damping levels and power delivery.

The steering system, for the first time in a Volkswagen, is located in front of the centre of the wheel. Volkswagen says this position “guarantees high stability during fast cornering.” Customers who opt for the “Plus” sports package will get the Progressive Steering as standard. This varies the steering ratio from 15.9:1 to 14.5:1, providing quicker and more direct turns.

The new Vehicle Dynamics Manager that’s found on the Golf Mk8 is also introduced on the DCC-equipped ID.4. This control module apparently elevates the car’s overall performance to a higher level, allowing it to behave more spontaneously, linearly and accurately. While cheaper ID.4s are RWD, the electronics onboard help ensure that it won’t oversteer. This is facilitated by the ESC and speed-based traction control system.

As for wheels, the starting size is 18 inches, and they are either made from steel or aluminium. The selection goes up to 21-inch units. While big, Volkswagen says the ID.4 only requires a turning circle of 10.2 metres – that’s comparatively low for a vehicle in its class, it says.

The flat spokes of the wheels are done for optimum aerodynamic efficiency. This is further aided by low rolling resistance tyres, which are fitted as standard from the factory.

For brakes, ID.4 models equipped with the larger 77 kWh battery pack get 358 mm discs up front, while the rear is managed by drum brakes. Volkswagen says the brake pads are designed to last the lifespan of the car (because most of the braking is done via the electric motor, which recoups energy in the process), and they are impervious to corrosion.

Now, to quickly recap, there are eight ID.4 models to choose from, available in either 52 kWh or 77 kWh battery pack configurations. The latter offers up to 520 km of range (WLTP) on a single charge, and the electric SUV can be had with as much as 204 PS. You may read all about it, here.