Nearly a year on from the debut of the facelifted Volkswagen Tiguan, its larger Allspace sibling finally gets its own nip and tuck. The seven-seater SUV, making up more than half of all Tiguan sales globally, receives virtually identical changes to the aesthetics and technologies while retaining the same mechanicals as before.

Those changes include a completely redesigned front end, featuring slimmer LED headlights (with available IQ.Light matrix technology and sequential indicators) with Mk8 Golf-style “tails”, plus a larger grille with a downward dip along the lower edge. Here, the Allspace is differentiated from the regular Tiguan via an optional light strip in the grille that joins the headlights, again in a similar fashion to the Golf.

The bumper has also been re-profiled with a sweptback air intake design and C-shaped bumper corner trim. Along the side, the front fender appliqués have been made slimmer and longer, while the rear end incorporates new centred Tiguan badging on the tailgate, a full-width reflector strip and a revised rear valence with fake exhaust exits. Adding the IQ.Light option also adds new taillights with inverted L-shaped graphics.

As before, you can specify the Allspace with the R-Line package, which comes with a larger bone-shaped air intake framed by chrome and gloss black trim, body-coloured cladding and a rear diffuser with integrated quad “tailpipes”. There are also new wheel options that measure between 17 and 20 inches in diameter.

Inside, the Allspace benefits (or suffers, depending where you stand) from touch-sensitive switches on the new three-spoke steering wheel and the climate controls. A digital instrument display is now standard with an eight-inch screen, while a larger ten-inch screen is available as an option. The infotainment systems offered on the car have also been upgraded to the third-generation Modular Infotainment Matrix (MIB3).

Other options include wireless smartphone charging, wireless Apple CarPlay and Android Auto connectivity, 15-colour ambient lighting and nine-speaker, 480-watt premium sound systems from either Fender (in the US) or Harman Kardon (in Europe). Safety-wise, all models come with at least autonomous emergency braking with pedestrian detection, blind spot monitoring and rear cross traffic alert.

Buyers can specify the IQ.Drive package that throws in adaptive cruise control with stop and go and lane centring assist to provide Level 2 semi-autonomous driving. There are also a number of optional safety features, such as automatic high beam, parking assist and traffic sign recognition.

Engine options remain the same as before and include a 150 PS 1.5 litre TSI turbocharged four-cylinder petrol engine and a 2.0 litre all-wheel drive version with either 190 PS or 245 PS. A 2.0 litre TDI turbodiesel is also offered with 150 PS or 200 PS, while the gearbox options are a six-speed manual and a seven-speed DSG dual-clutch transmission.

The US, on the other hand, gets the 190 PS 2.0 litre petrol with either front- or all-wheel drive, mated to an eight-speed automatic. Unlike the standard Tiguan, the Allspace won’t be getting the plug-in eHybrid variant, nor the high-performance R.