This will surely differ according to location, but which variant of the latest 2021 Toyota Hilux facelift do you see the most? I’ve almost always seen the range-topping 2.8L Rogue; conversely, I don’t remember the 2.4L model or how it looks like.

Now I know, thanks to this comparison video from Toyota Petra Jaya. The Kuching dealership puts both the flagship Rogue and the next highest Hilux variant, the 2.4V, side by side. By the way, the latest Hilux range was launched in October 2020, and the line-up reads Single Cab 2.4 MT 2.4E AT, 2.4G MT, 2.4V AT and the 2.8 Rogue AT.

Like before, 2.4L and 2.8L GD turbodiesel engines are available, but the bigger unit is reserved for the Rogue. The 1G-FTV now makes 204 PS at 3,400 rpm and 500 Nm from 1,600 to 2,800 rpm, which is a significant 27 PS and 50 Nm jump from before. Despite the higher output, Toyota claims that fuel consumption is lower by 4% to an average of 10.9 km/l. The engine gains a heavy-duty turbo unit that’s now water-cooled (was air-cooled).

The rest of the Hilux range is powered by the 2GD-FTV 2.4L engine with 150 PS at 3,400 rpm and 400 Nm from 1,600 to 2,000 rpm. This variable nozzle turbocharger (VNT) equipped unit has received improvements in cooling and fuel economy. Thanks to increased pressure in the commonrail system, fuel efficiency is up 5%. Perhaps more significant is the doubled service interval of 10,000 km or six months.

All variants come with six-speed transmissions – automatic with sequential shift or a manual for the workhorse single cab and the 2.4G double cab. The steering now has a Variable Flow Control system (except the Single Cab) with reduced demand on the power steering pump, helping fuel economy. The Rogue and 2.4V get an Auto LSD to help with traction. All are 4×4 high riders.

Oily bits aside, what are the kit that sets the Rogue apart from the top-spec 2.4L Hilux? They look rather different, thanks to the macho and more hardcore look of the flagship, which is the trend these days with pick-up trucks. The chrome nose of the 2.4V is big, but the Rogue takes it full height; without chrome accents on the grill and headlamp clusters.

The Rogue’s black plastic trim continues on the overfenders. While both ride on 18-inch wheels (with 265/60 highway terrain rubber), the designs are different. The 2.4V gets chrome on the wing mirror caps and door handles (black on Rogue), while the Rogue sports decals. At the back, the range-topper has a prominent tailgate handle garnish with the Hilux name on it. No chrome bumpers, too.

All the other shared kit include automatic bi-LED projectors with LED DRLs and fog lamps, Optitron meters with a 4.2-inch colour multi-info display, keyless entry with push start, leather steering, automatic air con and rear vents, and a dashcam as standard.

The Rogue and 2.4V get powered front seats and footwell lighting, with the flagship adding on door trim lighting. The 2.4V’s chairs are powered and covered by combination leather, while the Rogue gets perforated combi leather in black-grey.

Safety wise, the top two Hilux variants get the full seven airbags, Blind Spot Monitor with Rear Cross Traffic Alert, and security and solar tinting. The Rogue adds on Toyota Safety Sense, which consists of Pre-Collision System (PCS), Dynamic Radar Cruise Control (DRCC) and Lane Departure Alert (LDA) with Yaw Assist. A telematics system is also standard on the V and Rogue (optional for the other variants), which are priced at RM133,880 and RM146,880 respectively, on the road without insurance.

While the Hilux is the pick-up truck segment’s leader, most of the Toyota’s rivals have recently reloaded and are ready for battle. The Isuzu D-Max is all-new, the Nissan Navara has a bold new look and a fresh Pro-4x flagship variant, while Mitsubishi has replaced the Triton Adventure X with the fierce-looking Triton Athlete. All are going for the overtly macho look – who does it best for you? Click and compare.

GALLERY: 2021 Toyota Hilux 2.8 Rogue