Opel has just announced the return of its iconic rear-wheel drive sports coupe, the Manta. It’s not a brand new model, but rather a restomodded version of the 1970 original. This one-off special is meant to celebrate the automaker’s 50th birthday and its transition to electric, so the vehicle has not been subject to WLTP type-approval testing.

The reborn coupe is called the Manta GSe ElektroMOD, and it is the first electric restomod that Opel has created. As you can clearly tell, it combines the classic style of the original, albeit evidently enhanced with modern features.

For starters, the four-cylinder engine under the black bonnet has been replaced with a 108 kW (147 PS, 225 Nm) electric motor. The original four-speed gearbox is retained, so drivers can choose to manually change gears, or engage the fourth gear and drive off automatically.

It is fitted with a 31 kWh lithium-ion battery, although Opel did not specify its exact placement. On a full charge, the battery provides close to 200 km of range, and the charging socket can be found inside the fuel lid. The 9 kW onboard charger juices up the battery in under four hours, and there is also regenerative braking to help recoup some range.

Now, design-wise, the reborn Manta gets Opel’s latest Vizor-style front fascia, complete with LED daytime running lights and the automaker’s Pixel technology. Pixel is a display panel that resides in the same black section as the LED DRLs, and allows drivers to issue scripted messages (both text and images) for others to see. You may watch the short clip above to see how it works.

The rear features the iconic circular tail lights, now enhanced with a striking three-dimensional LED design. There’s also the Manta script on the boot. The bright yellow example sits on staggered 17-inch Ronal wheels, wrapped with 195/40 tyres at the front, and 205/40 rubbers at the back. The chrome fender trims on the original car have been deleted as well.

Inside, the Manta GSe features the Vauxhall’s (Opel’s sister brand) latest digital technology. The classic round instruments have been replaced by the Vauxhall Pure Panel, with two driver-oriented 12-inch and 10-inch displays. The infotainment unit is hooked up to a Marshall sound system, too.

As for the seats, they are all new and properly modern, wrapped with Alcantara and genuine leather. White contrast stitching is used, and the centre features a strip of yellow line. The driver is greeted with a Petri three-spoke steering wheel (reworked by Opel), and it too has a yellow accent at the 12 o’ clock position.

Elsewhere, the cabin is finished with matte grey trims, matching the neo-classic’s other yellow and black coloured elements. The ceiling of the passenger compartment is lined with Alcantara, too. Both Vauxhall and Opel have pledged to offer an electrified variant across their entire model line-up by 2024. So, what do you think of this reborn Manta?