Nearly three months after the devastating floods of late 2021, heavy thunderstorms continue to hammer the east coast of Malaysia, increasing the possibility of more flash floods. Having been criticised for their slow response before, local municipalities are now on full alert, with logistics and manpower ready to be mobilised.

According to The Star, the authorities have initiated various flood mitigation efforts in an attempt to reduce the occurrence of floods, protecting homes and businesses. The English-language daily also said that municipalities in Shah Alam and Klang, areas that were some of the worst affected by the December 18 floods, were using real-time data to monitor the current situation.

The Shah Alam City Council (MBSA) was reportedly monitoring its reservoirs and pumps in areas like Taman Sri Muda, Taman Mesra, Kampung Kebun Bunga, Padang Jawa and Section 13 to ensure they were functioning as intended. Meanwhile, the Klang Municipal Council (MPK) was using CCTV cameras to monitor the floods around the clock. “A Quick Response Unit is on standby and we have increased checks on drainage networks,” said president Noraini Roslan.

Some 34 flash flood hotspots were also identified by the Petaling Jaya City Council (MBPJ), which has allocated RM28 million to carry out flood mitigation projects. The latter would cover pre-flood, mid-flood and post-flood incidents, said mayor Mohamad Azhan Md Amir.

In Subang Jaya, the Subang Jaya City Council (MBSJ) has been updating its social media platforms with flood-related alerts and has activated its disaster operations room at its command centre. The room has been on standby since the start of the monsoon season, The Star reported.

As for Kuala Lumpur, the Kuala Lumpur City Hall (DBKL) has said it will broadcast alerts on its electronic billboards should flood warnings be triggered. Its operations room at Menara DBKL 1 on Jalan Raja Laut will be activated to coordinate a response for flood victims if required. Local agencies and authorities are also upgrading and clearing drainage to accommodate surface runoff and prevent flooding, it was reported.

While we’re talking about floods, it’s a good time to remind you to take up Special Perils insurance coverage for your vehicle to shield you from any damage caused by water ingress. This add-on covers natural disasters and acts of God, including floods. Tick the optional box and you’ll be reimbursed by the insurance provider should your car suffer damage from natural disasters.

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We have recently tabled the various costs of adding on Special Perils coverage from most auto insurance companies here in Malaysia, including AIA, AIG, Allianz, AXA, Etiqa, Kurnia, MPI Generali, MSIG, RHB, Takaful and Tokio Marine. The rates vary between 0.15% to 0.50% from company to company.

For example, if you’re insuring a car for RM50,000, you’re paying as little as RM75 with MPI Generali, while other insurance providers like Allianz, AXA, MSIG and Tokio Marine offer the coverage for RM100. With higher rates like those provided by AIA, AIG, Etiqa, Kurnia, RHB and Takaful, the payable amount is between RM125 to RM250.

While certainly not negligible amounts, it sure sounds worth it if you ever need the coverage, right? Click here for more details on Special Perils add-on.