Take a look at the boot of the pre-facelift E66 (the models with long wheelbase are E66 instead of E65) BMW 7-series above. Supposedly a BMW 770Li. And there’s a W12 badge on a left, ala Volkswagen style. Of course, everyone knows there’s no such thing as a BMW 770Li, and a check of the number plate with the UK’s RAC Motoring Services reveal that the car is actually a BMW 735Li. Why the need to pretend your car is a 770Li instead of what it really is?

Previously, Cycle & Carriage Bintang Bhd’s managing director Steven Foster recollected his experience with a customer in China way back in 1993. He was selling Mercedes Benz cars in China, and a customer had approached him with intentions to buy a Mercedes Benz S600. The customer also enquired if there was any S800 models available, to which Foster replied there was no such model.

The customer then asked if Foster could custom make a S800 badge for his S600, to which Foster obliged, since the S600 is the three pointed star’s top of the line model after all. Customers with such deep pockets must go home feeling satisfied. So the customer did go home feeling satisfied, driving his new S800-badged S-class.

We also see things like Nismo badges on Proton Sagas, and Type R stickers on D15A engine CVT-equipped Honda Civics. There are also more and more BMW 318is carrying M badges on their boot lids, and I’ve even seen an E30 with the M badge stuck on upside down – a BMW W3?! Why do some people feel the need to do this?