Tired of reduced features and extended wait lists for a brand new car? Well, that is likely not going away until 2024, no thanks to the global semiconductor shortage, a Volkswagen Group executive told Automotive News Europe.

Company chief of finance Arno Antlitz said the chip crisis isn’t even close to ending, an issue spurred by a “structural undersupply in 2022, which is only likely to ease somewhat in the third or fourth quarter.” He also said “the situation should improve in 2023, but the structural problem will not yet have been fully resolved.”

The Covid-19 outbreak which caused multiple lockdowns in 2020 and 2021 have dealt a heavy blow to chip manufacturing. This is further exacerbated by the Ukraine-Russia conflict, forcing factories that manufacture wiring harnesses to shutter temporarily.

According to a Reuters report, BMW and Porsche are among several automakers that source wiring harnesses from Ukraine suppliers, and have put production on hold due to the shortage. Both firms have apparently set up “crisis teams” to manage the disruption caused by the conflict.

The report also added that wiring harnesses are the most critical automotive component exported to the European Union from Ukraine, accounting for nearly 7% of all imports of this product. Wiring harnesses bundle up to 5 km of cables in an average car, each of which are unique to a vehicle model. It could take months for suppliers to increase production capacity at other locations.