Spy-Shots of Cars - This image has been optimized for a calibrated screen with a Gamma of 2.2 and a colour temperature og 6500°K

Spy-Shots of Cars – This image has been optimized for a calibrated screen with a Gamma of 2.2 and a colour temperature og 6500°K

Prior to the start of last year’s New York Auto Show, Land Rover introduced its Discovery Vision concept, which it says will preview the design language of the new Discovery family, evident with the introduction of the Land Rover Discovery Sport that challenges the BMW X3 and Mercedes-Benz GLC-Class.

As part of Land Rover’s revised range of vehicles, its new Discovery sub-brand will include the aforementioned Discovery Sport, and the larger Discovery, which has yet to make its global debut. Thanks to our spy photographers, we now have a first look at the all-new seven-seater SUV, which will replace the current version.

Based on what we see of the heavily camouflaged test mule, the familiar outlook of the Discovery does appear to be present, with the slightly off-positioned third window near the C-pillar still remaining as a design highlight.

However, there are significant alterations seen beginning at the front, where the traditional square-ish headlights are now replaced with sleeker, more rectangular ones. It’s hard to tell the lighting element used, but expect them to be of the LED variety.

Spy-Shots of Cars - This image has been optimized for a calibrated screen with a Gamma of 2.2 and a colour temperature og 6500°K

Spy-Shots of Cars – This image has been optimized for a calibrated screen with a Gamma of 2.2 and a colour temperature og 6500°K

Continuing on, the previous model’s large upright grille has been replaced with a smaller, more rounded one as well. There appear to be intakes near the corners of the bumpers as well, partially seen through the mesh netting covering them.

In profile, the Discovery does introduce a bit more curvature to its design, seen mainly at the front, and at the rear from the C-pillar onwards. The latter is certainly a nod to the Vision Concept from New York.

Meanwhile, the rear doesn’t appear to go through as radical a transformation like the Discovery’s front. Unlike the concept, the SUV’s pillar-mounted tail lights are still retained, along with the familiar split-tailgate design.

Spy-Shots of Cars - This image has been optimized for a calibrated screen with a Gamma of 2.2 and a colour temperature og 6500°K

Spy-Shots of Cars – This image has been optimized for a calibrated screen with a Gamma of 2.2 and a colour temperature og 6500°K

Underpinning the new Land Rover Discovery will be the carmaker’s Premium Lightweight Architecture (PLA) that is also found in the Range Rover and Range Rover Sport. The platform utilises aluminium in its construction and should make the next-generation Discovery lighter than that of the current model.

Engine options would most probably include Jaguar Land Rover’s range of Ingenium petrol and diesel engines, with an eight-speed automatic transmission being offered across the range.

The Vision Concept also previewed JLR’s “invisible body” technology that uses cameras to provide the driver a view of the area just in front and underneath the nose of the vehicle. Laser headlights were also fitted on the concept, capable of projecting markings and symbols to aid driving through tight spaces.


Land Rover Discovery Vision concept