Lego seems to have developed an obsession for the Bugatti Chiron, so much so that it has gone to lengths to create a life-sized version of the RM1,799 1:8 Technic model it released earlier in June.

Well, what you’re seeing here is the first ever life-sized and drivable Lego Technic model, built without use of a single drop of glue. That’s right, every piece of Lego brick – over 1,000,000 individual pieces – was carefully modelled and pieced together to recreate the Chiron as precisely as possible.

It weighs an astonishing 1.5 tonnes, which is just 500 kg shy of the actual car’s kerb weight. It’s powered powered exclusively using motors from the Lego Power Function platform, packed with 2,304 motors, 4,032 Lego Technic gear wheels and 2,016 Lego Technic cross axles. In total, the engine generates 5.3 horsepower and an estimated torque of 92 Nm. Its top speed? Just over 20 kilometres per hour.

That’s not all. It even has a functional rear spoiler that’s developed by Lego Power Functions and Pneumatics, as well as a functional speedometer built entirely from Lego Technic elements. As you can tell, the only items that are not made by Lego are the alloy wheels and Bugatti badge.

Development and construction of the outlandish Lego project took 13,438 actual man hours, which is equivalent to 560 days of laborious work. The result is objectively impressive – look closer and you’ll see the complex outer ‘skin’ structure, built from interconnected triangular segments that are designed to mimic the shape of the real Chiron. Triangles are widely considered to be the strongest shape because a triangular structure subject to strong forces only collapses due to material fatigue and not to geometric distortion.

Inside, every single detail of the car has been precisely recreated in LEGO Technic elements, from seats, to the dashboard and steering wheel. There are functional headlights and tail lights, a detachable steering wheel and brake pedal as well. The whole build required the use of 339 types of Lego Technic elements.

Official Bugatti pilot and former Le Mans winner Andy Wallace was tasked with testing the Lego Technic Chiron at the Ehra Lessien proving ground in Germany, a unique high-speed test track where the original Chiron was first tested. He said, “driving the Lego Chiron was a great experience, which I thoroughly enjoyed. All those years ago I could never have imagined that one day I would actually drive a Lego car!”

It’s a success with many firsts. Besides being the first ever drivable Lego Technic car, it is the first non-glued Lego Technic model of such complexity, first large model powered using Lego Technic power function motors, first large-scale moving model using Lego Technic bricks and elements, first to feature new types of transparent Lego Technic bricks (for the LED headlights and such) and first to create load bearing parts built purely out of Lego Technic bricks and elements.

The people that made this happen comprise of 16 specialists covering the areas of design, mechanical and electrical experts. So, do you dare build a Lego Technic with over a million pieces of bricks?

GALLERY: Bugatti Chiron not made of Lego