The government has cancelled 4.03 million outstanding Automated Enforce­ment System (AES) summonses worth RM605 million. The summonses were issued from 2012 to August 31 this year, said transport minister Anthony Loke, reported by Bernama.

He announced in August that all existing AES summonses will be wiped out, letting all offending drivers off the hook. Now, the cancelled summonses are no longer in the JPJ’s Digital Technology Division data centre in Cyberjaya. Yup, “this means AES summonses issued before September 1 are no longer in the data,” Loke told reporters after visiting the centre yesterday.

“This is a one-off. After September 1, the JPJ will fully take over the operations of AES and any summons issued then has to be paid. There will not be any more such offers or discounts,” Loke said then, adding that those who did pay will not be getting any refunds. “The money paid went to the concessionaires appointed by the (previous) government. We are in no position to refund because the government did not benefit.”

Of course, this does not mean that AES is no more – it’s now being managed by JPJ. From September 1 to November 8, a total of 60,444 AES summonses were issued for breaking the speed limit, but only 1,711 had been settled by motorists. In that period, 4,575 summonses were issued for running the red lights but only 167 were paid. The government will step up action to ensure compliance.

“To date, 1,190 cases have been brought to courts in Kedah, Perak and Penang but only three offenders turned up,” Loke said. He added that the department would take stern action against those who failed to pay the summonses within 60 days by taking them to court, failing which warrants of arrest would be issued.