The finalists for the 2019 European Car of the Year award have been revealed ahead of next year’s Geneva Motor Show, where the eventual winner will be revealed. Seven cars managed to earn their spot in the grand finale after being shortlisted from a list of 38 candidates by 60 jury members.

The first model vying for the prize is the Alpine A110, which is a mid-engined, two-seater coupe that recaptures the spirit of the classic sports car. In modern guise, the A110 packs a 1.8 litre turbocharged four-cylinder engine that makes 252 PS and 320 Nm of torque, with drive send to the rear via a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic gearbox.

Next up is the Citroen C5 Aircross that first debuted in China before reaching European markets later on. Previewed by Aircross concept, the SUV is built on the PSA Group’s EMP2 platform; features extroverted styling; and is slated to arrive in Malaysia in 2019.

Ford’s new Focus also made it to the list, and is available in Europe with EcoBoost petrol and EcoBlue diesel engines. The Focus comes in three body-styles – five-door hatch, a five-door estate and a four-door sedan – the latter being available only in selected markets.

A rival to the Focus, the Kia Ceed joins the other finalists with a brand new name (previously known as the cee’d), revised styling and an expanded list of equipment. The Ceed is also available in hot hatch guise with a 204 PS/265 Nm 1.6 litre T-GDi petrol engine, paired with a six-speed manual or seven-speed dual-cutch.

Yet another hatchback on the list is the latest Mercedes-Benz A-Class, a model that is already on sale here in Malaysia. The sleek new design of the W177 is coupled to other new technologies such as a smaller 1.33 litre turbo four-cylinder co-developed with Renault and the Mercedes-Benz User Experience (MBUX) infotainment system.

The sixth member in this seven-way fight is the Peugeot 508, with the D-segment model slated to arrive on Malaysian shores in the second quarter of 2019. Now adopting a fastback body shape, the attractive sedan draws inspiration from Peugeot concepts such as the Exalt and Instinct.

Lastly, there’s the Jaguar I-Pace, the British brand’s first all-electric vehicle that fits an electric powertrain into a stylish SUV body. Thanks to a 90 kWh battery, there is up to 480 km of range on tap (following WLTP standards), and the two electric motors (one on each axle) provides 400 PS and 696 Nm – good for a century sprint time of 4.8 seconds. The 2019 German Car of the Year winner is also available as a racing version if you’re interested.

As a reminder, last year’s winner of the award was the Volvo XC40. With the finalists now revealed, which car do you think deserve to win the title of 2019 European Car of the Year? Sound off in the comments below.