The all-new 992 generation Porsche 911 GT3 RS has arrived and as the moniker is the first thing to catch the eye, introduction to the new GT3 RS should begin with the swan-neck rear wing. It’s significantly larger in all dimensions and consists of a fixed main wing and an upper wing that’s hydraulically adjustable. For the first time in a production Porsche, the rear wing is taller than the roof.

The new 911 GT3 RS also marks the first time a Drag Reduction System (DRS) is fitted into a production Porsche. DRS flattens the wings momentarily with a push of a button, for reduced drag and higher speeds in a straight line. The rear wing also work as air brakes during high speed emergency braking, rotating to its most vertical angle to create a deceleration effect.

Together with the active slats positioned behind the front splitter, the GT3 RS can generate 409 kg of down-force at 200 km/h and 860 kg at 285 km/h. That’s twice as much downforce as the previous generation 991.2 GT3 RS, and three times as much as the current 911 GT3.

Other aerodynamic enhancements include larger louvred openings atop the front fenders, a new door design for better air passage from the front wheels, and a redesigned rear diffuser from the current 911 GT3. The large nostril cutouts on the front bonnet help relieve hot air from the new centrally-positioned radiator, while a pair of fins on the roof direct air outwards to ensure cooler air for the rear intakes.

Even the suspension of the car has been given aerodynamic attention. Components of the double-wishbone front axle were designed with teardrop-shaped profiles, an approach usually reserved for high-end motorsport applications. This helps to increase front downforce by around 40 kg at top speed.

For the first time, the GT3 RS’ doors are made of carbon-fibre, along with the ducktail spoiler, roof, rear wing, front fenders and bonnet. To save weight, the GT3 RS also uses thinner glass at all four corners for a total weight of just 1,450 kg.

Power comes from a 4.0 litre naturally-aspirated flat-six with a 9,000 rpm redline, paired with a seven-speed PDK gearbox with shorter ratios than the 911 GT3. To ensure cooler transmission temperatures, the underbody of the GT3 RS features air intakes. Armed with 525 hp and 465 Nm of torque, 0-100 km/h is done in 3.2 seconds, and at the end of its seventh gear, the GT3 RS’ speedometer will read 296 km/h.

Aerodynamics aside, the GT3 RS’ centrally-positioned single radiator (replacing the three-radiator layout from before) was also inspired by the 911 GT3 R and Le Mans class-winning 911 RSR race car. The large, angled radiator also means there is now no trunk space up front.

The GT3 RS comes standard with 20-inch forged light alloy, centre-lock wheels, with 275/35 profile tyres at the front, and a 21-inch pair wrapped in 335/30 profile tyres at the rear. Porsche Ceramic Composite Brakes offering 410 mm discs at the front and 390 mm discs at the rear can be specified. As standard, the GT3 RS is fitted with six-pot fixed calliper brakes in the front, and four-pot units at the back.

The centrepiece of the interior is the new steering wheel with rotary dials, which allow drivers to adjust suspension settings including compression and rebound, damping, and rear differential settings. This can be done when in Track Mode, one of three driving modes along with Sport and Normal.

The new steering also features a button to activate the DRS on the rear wing. In typical RS fashion, the interior is finished with black leather, Racetex and carbon-weave finishing. A Clubsport package is available – adding a steel roll cage, fire-extinguisher, and six-point harness – at no extra cost.

The Weissach package, however, will come at a price as the front bonnet, roof, parts of the rear wing and door handles feature exposed carbon-fibre. The performance package also adds a carbon-fibre roll cage – the first time in a Porsche – along with carbon-fibre front and rear anti-roll bars and rear coupling rods.

Another highlight of the Weissach package is the PDK shift paddles with motorsport-derived magnet technology. This makes gear changes even more dynamic thanks to a more precise pressure point and a clearly perceptible click. Other optional Weissach goodies available include magnesium forged wheels, which save eight kg.

As if owning the car isn’t enough, Porsche’s own watchmaking operation in Solothurn, Switzerland, has developed the 911 GT3 RS chronograph, reserved especially for GT3 RS customers. Inside the watch is the mechanical Porsche Design chronograph calibre WERK 01.200, while the body features design elements and materials from the GT3 RS.