Hyundai has made it clear that it will introduce the Ioniq 5 N next year as the high-performance version of the award-winning electric vehicle (EV). First revealed globally last February, the Ioniq 5 is built on the Electric-Global Modular Platform (E-GMP) that also underpins its sister model from Kia, the EV6.

We’ve already been given a glimpse of the upcoming Ioniq 5 N (wearing a lot of camouflage) in a video showcasing the South Korean carmaker’s “rolling lab” vehicles, although there’s not much in the way of details. However, recent reports by CarExpert, Goodwood Road & Racing as well as EV Central have helped paint a slightly better picture.

Speaking to Albert Biermann, who is currently serving as an executive technical advisor for Hyundai Motor Group (HMG) in Europe, it was revealed that the Ioniq 5 N will look deliver the same thrills that an internal combustion engine (ICE) sports car can offer, converting headstrong enthusiasts in the process.

Biermann isn’t new to this world, having worked on BMW M cars for several years before joining HMG. One of his first projects with Hyundai is the i30 N, a hot hatchback that challenged established nameplates in the segment.

“We want to get the petrolheads who still today say they will never drive an EV because this is no fun,” said Biermann. “We want to have some of those guys sitting in an Ioniq 5 N and going on track days with the Ioniq 5 N and giving that traditional-thinking petrolhead a good lesson as to what is a fast lap around a race track. [It] could be fun to show these guys what an EV is capable of today,” he added.

Some of the technologies that will go into the Ioniq 5 are being developed on the RN22e, which is one of the rolling labs that resembles the Ioniq 6. These systems include N e-Shift that aims to match the feel of a dual-clutch transmission like in current ICE-powered N models.

This virtual shift mode, or Virtual Grin Shift (VGS) as Biermann is tentatively calling it for now, is activated by pressing a button on the steering wheel and pulling the paddle shifters at the same time. When activated, the system “holds” gears and will hit a “redline,” with speed being limited in each gear like it would with a DCT.

The system is joined by N Sound Plus for auditory immersion, with the latter simulating ICE and gearbox noises. Hyundai says it will add sounds with future over-the-air updates and owners will also be able to add their own faux noises. The Ioniq 5 N is also said to come with a drift mode as well as beefier brakes for the regenerative braking system.

Technical specifications remain a mystery, although it should be noted that the RN22e, which is the rolling lab for the Ioniq 5 N, packs a dual-motor powertrain delivering 585 PS (577 hp or 430 kW) and 740 Nm of torque. Those figures are the same as the EV6 in GT guise, and the E-GMP architecture is designed to handle 800-volt charging. Fast charging is assured, although race circuits will need to have chargers capable of getting the Ioniq 5 N back on track as soon as possible.