One year on from the initial rollout of RFID as a highway toll payment method, disruptions with the system persist as former minister in the prime minister’s department, Datuk Seri Abdul Rahman Dahlan stated his frustration with the use of RFID lanes on Twitter, and had mentioned transport minister Anthony Loke Siew Fook in his tweet in a bid to have the situation rectified.

Loke replied to the tweet, clarifying that RFID operation at highway toll plazas “is under Lembaga Lebuhraya (the Malaysian Highway Authority)”, and that he will discuss the matter with works minister Datuk Seri Alexander Nanta Linggi.

While there is response on a ministerial level, RFID users should, in the meantime continue to take the necessary steps to ensure that there are no other factors contributing to any technical issue with its usage.

Firstly, users need to ensure that the RFID tag is correctly affixed to their vehicle, especially if one applying the tag themselves using the self-fitment kit. This RFID tag need to be positioned at least 5 cm away from metal parts to prevent any possible interference, and applied on the windscreen, this means away from the A-pillar, and if placed on the headlamp, this needs to be in the middle to be distanced from the bodywork.

If one chooses to affix the RFID tag to the vehicle’s windscreen, be sure to place the tag away from the wipers’ paths, and take note if your window tint film of choice, if applicable, has a high metal content which may cause interference; if this is the case, the headlamp will likely be the preferred site of RFID tag installation on the vehicle.

Also, users need to ensure that the is sufficient balance in the Touch ‘n Go eWallet for the payment of toll fare. Users also need to be sure to have sufficient balance in their Touch ‘n Go card where RFID is not applicable; in any case, the Malaysian Highway Authority instructed highway concessionaire PLUS to maintain operation of both SmartTAG and Touch ‘n Go lanes at toll booths.

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