Polestar is going on a bit of a tear at the moment, with three electric cars due to be introduced over the coming two years. Despite all this, it has still found the time to design a gorgeous new concept called the O2, a four-seater convertible with a folding hard top.

The car is unique in that it uses a bonded aluminium construction, likely using technology from fellow Geely subsidiary Lotus. In fact, the structure is adapted from the one on the Polestar 5 (itself the production version of the Precept concept), which was developed around 200 km away from Hethel at the Polestar R&D facility in Coventry, England.

As the second all-new design from Polestar, the O2 sports the company’s latest design language, diverging from the Volvo-derived styling of the Polestar 1 and 2. Just like the Precept, the characteristic T-shaped “Thor’s Hammer” headlights remain, but here they are paired to a grille-less front end (there’s a “SmartZone” panel housing the car’s cameras and sensors instead) and slim air intakes.

Integrated ducts direct air over the massive 22-inch flat-faced alloy wheels and sculpted body sides to improve laminar air flow, thereby increasing aerodynamic efficiency. As befits a a two-door convertible, the wheelbase is dramatically shorter than the Precept’s, while the fastback roof sweeps elegantly downwards towards the turbulence-reducing blade-like taillights, meeting with the upwards-sweeping window line. The hard top folds neatly into the space underneath the buttressed rear clamshell.

Step inside and you’ll find an interior much like the Precept, minus several inches of rear legroom. There’s the slim horizontal dashboard, a large 15-inch portrait touchscreen, a slim digital instrument display, a floating centre armrest and four large white bucket seats with gold seat belts.

Polestar is making a big deal about its sustainability efforts, filling the interior with lots of recyclable “mono-materials”. This means that a single base material is used to make each component – for instance, all the soft bits are made out of recycled polyester, including the foam, adhesive, 3D-knit fibres and non-woven lamination. All this simplifies recycling while reducing weight and waste.

This renewed focus on “circularity”, or the practice of recycling materials and products as long as possible, even extends to the aluminium construction. The different grades of the metal used in the car are labelled, enabling them to be recycled more effectively and maintain their various characteristics. This allows for greater material efficiency and reduces the need to use virgin aluminium.

The different grades were used to improve the car’s rigidity, increasing its dynamic response. Polestar says the O2 has taut handling with small roll angles and high roll damping, as well as linear and direct steering with good steering torque buildup. The company claims it has tuned the chassis to make the car feel “lively, light and full of confidence.” No technical details have been released, but we can expect the car to share much of its makeup with the upcoming Polestar 5.

Oh, and one more thing – the Polestar O2 also comes with an autonomous drone hidden behind the rear seats. Developed in collaboration with Hoco Flow, the consumer electronics brand of another Geely subsidiary, Aerofugia, this small aircraft can be deployed while on the move to record the car as it is being driven.

Drivers can choose between a wider “atmospheric sequence” or a close-up “action-filled sequence” that makes the car look sportier. The drone can keep up at speeds of up to 90 km/h and can return to the car autonomously. Videos can be edited and shared through the centre display when the car is parked.