Honda City Hatchback 2022

  • GALLERY: 2022 Honda City 1.5 V petrol sedan vs City Hatchback 1.5 RS e:HEV hybrid; RM91k – RM110k

    GALLERY: 2022 Honda City 1.5 V petrol sedan vs City Hatchback 1.5 RS e:HEV hybrid; RM91k – RM110k

    Launched in Malaysia last December, the Honda City Hatchback arrived as a bodystyle that much more closely resembles the City sedan, at least from the front, as the current, fourth-generation Honda Jazz has not found its way officially into the Malaysian market.

    Why not the Jazz? According to City Hatchback large project leader Rei Sakamoto, the City nameplate has become a well-built brand, and development of both sedan and hatchback models were incorporated to maximise efficiency and to build both models on the same platform, and this decision was made for the regional market.

    Therefore, it is the City nameplate in both sedan and hatchback forms that we receive in the Malaysian market, and here we have brought together an example of each – a City 1.5L V sedan and a City Hatchback 1.5 RS e:HEV.

    The City Hatchback here in RS trim packs the e:HEV hybrid powertrain, which packs a 109 PS/253 Nm electric motor for propulsion, and is charged by an Atkinson-cycle 1.5 litre engine making 98 PS at 5,600 rpm to 6,400 rpm and 127 Nm from 4,500 rpm to 5,000 rpm; the latter can also clutch in to augment the e-motor for added drive at higher speeds where it is at its most efficient.

    The City sedan and City Hatchback closely resemble each other, especially viewed from the front, albeit with differences in equipment for the hatchback in RS trim that brings a honeycomb grille in black with a gloss black grille bar, darkened internal sections for its LED headlamps, front fog lamp surrounds with extended louvres and a faux diffuser insert for the rear bumper.

    For comparison, the front fascia of the City sedan in 1.5 V trim gets a chromed grille bar, horizontally-slatted grille and regular-sized foglamp surround inserts, along with a body-coloured lower intake edge (this is black on the hatchback’s RS trim).

    Moving along to the sides, the 1.5 V sedan gets side mirror covers in its body colour while these on the 1.5 RS e:HEV hatch are in gloss black. Rolling stock on the 1.5 RS e:HEV are 16-inch two-tone machine-finished alloy wheels shod in tyres measuring 185/55, while the City 1.5 V sedan wears identically sized wheels and tyres, though with the former in a single-tone finish.

    The most apparent differences between the City sedan and Hatchback are located behind the front seats, though there are differences between the two to be found in front as well.

    Dashboard architecture is the same between the sedan and hatchback, with detail differences brought by their respective trim. packages. The RS trim of the Hatchback brings gloss black trim for steering wheel inserts, air-conditioning vent surrounds and contrasting red inserts on its leather and suede upholstery along with red contrast stitching on the steering wheel.

    By comparison, the black leather upholstery in the 1.5 V sedan is offset by cream-coloured panels, matching contrast stitching and silver air-conditioning vent surrounds.

    Honda City Hatchback 1.5 RS e:HEV (left), Honda City 1.5 V sedan (right); note the Ultra seats of the Hatchback

    At first glance, the rear passenger compartment of the City Hatchback and the sedan appear largely similar when the seats are in place. The versatility of the Hatchback becomes apparent when the Ultra seats can be folded to accommodate tall objects in the cabin, with the seat base folding rearwards to make space on the cabin floor for cargo.

    The rear seats in the City sedan fold down too, albeit with a smaller aperture due to the fixed rear bulkhead. In terms of outright luggage capacity, the City 1.5 V sedan holds 519 litres (409 litres if you plump for the RS e:HEV hybrid due to its intelligent power unit), while the City Hatchback holds 289 litres with its seats in place, or 841 litres with the rear seats folded. Loaded up to its roof, the Hatchback will take 1,189 litres.

    As of July 1, 2022, these are priced at RM90,600 (without Sensing suite) and RM109,800, respectively, following the brand’s adjustment of prices which now include SST. Both the City Hatchback and City sedan are covered by a five-year, unlimited-mileage warranty and come with five times free-labour servicing. On hybrid variants, the lithium-ion battery gets its own eight-year, unlimited-mileage warranty.

    We have already spent time with examples of the two bodystyles. Here, you can check out the in-depth reviews of the City sedan as well as of the Hatchback.

    2022 Honda City Hatchback RS e:HEV

    2022 Honda City 1.5V

     
     
  • REVIEW: 2022 Honda City Hatchback in Malaysia – RS e:HEV hybrid and V, priced from RM88k to RM108k

    REVIEW: 2022 Honda City Hatchback in Malaysia – RS e:HEV hybrid and V, priced from RM88k to RM108k

    I’ve always had a fondness for the Honda Jazz, particularly the second- and third-gen iterations of the nameplate. Shape aside, of which the second-gen GE remains my pick, there was always an element of fun and lightheartedness to it, a hatchback that didn’t take itself too seriously but did what it was supposed to do, faultlessly.

    Sure, it wasn’t perfect, but it had great practicality and, most importantly, character, enough that it resonated with more than 100,000 buyers here over three generations. So when the fourth one appeared on the horizon three years ago, the expectation was that it would carry on flying the flag for the small runabout.

    That of course never happened, the car being replaced in the scheme of things by the vehicle we’re discussing today, the City Hatchback, which made its local debut last December. The reasoning behind the switch, as the company put it in an interview with the car’s large project leader, was down to playing on the recognisable imprint of the City nameplate in the region and maximising efficiency by building both sedan and hatchback variants based on the same platform.

    It’s hard to argue against something like the economies of scale, but just how does the City Hatchback measure up? Does it ably fill the slot left vacant by the Jazz? Is it a better car than the one it replaces? An invitation by Honda Malaysia to put the car through its paces in Langkawi earlier this month answered some of the questions.

    A change in projection

    REVIEW: 2022 Honda City Hatchback in Malaysia – RS e:HEV hybrid and V, priced from RM88k to RM108k

    Where the last iteration of the Jazz had an avant-garde feel to it (and the new one, even more so), the same cannot be said of the City Hatchback. For the most, the lines mimic the sedan, with the same front end and doors. The lopped off rear means that there’s a new tail assembly, complete with new tail lights, the design of which looks like you’ve seen it somewhere before.

    It’s not a bad looking car, very easy on the eye from certain angles, but it is rather traditional in its approach as to how a hatchback should shape up. The base form looks a tad plain on its own, as exemplified by the V. The RS e:HEV, especially with the Modulo elements, shows what a little dressing up can do.

    Granted, this is meant to be a purposeful, practical car, one that can meet the billing of family requirements as well that of younger drivers, but correct me if you will, a hatch has always been geared towards buyers looking for a sportier proposition – never mind that it doesn’t go fast, it just has to look that. Decked out, the City Hatchback passes muster on that count – you won’t mistake it for a barnstormer, but it’s not dowdy.

    Interior format from the sedan retained

    As previously stated, measuring in at 4,345 mm long (4,349 mm for the RS), 1,748 mm wide and 1,488 mm tall, the car is longer and wider than the Jazz, but not as tall as the latter’s 1,524 mm height. Despite this, there’s plenty of space where rear occupants are concerned – clever packaging and Ultra Seats from the Jazz means there’s plenty of legroom, more than that of the sedan, even with the front seats slid back to accommodate lankier front occupants.

    REVIEW: 2022 Honda City Hatchback in Malaysia – RS e:HEV hybrid and V, priced from RM88k to RM108k

    Where the hatch falls slightly short is in boot space. Losing 200 mm to the sedan means that the 519 litres seen on that is a pipe dream for the Hatchback – it delivers 289 litres of boot space with the seats up, which is less than that of the Jazz (363 litres).

    With the rear seats folded down, the available volume (until the window line) goes up to 841 litres, but even on this count, the Jazz trumps it by offering 40 litres more. On the drive, the cargo space was able to accommodate smaller cabin-sized bags without fuss, but it looks like the aim of the design has been to maximise space for occupants.

    The lack of tail-end acreage is only under consideration if cargo hauling space is essential – I have a feeling that for the intended audience, this will be of little consequence; those wanting more would already have opted for the sedan.

    Otherwise, the cabin is a dead ringer for the sedan, including the dashboard, three-spoke steering wheel and front seats. In Langkawi, only the V and RS hybrid were presented on the drive, and equipment specs for the former include leather upholstery, soft-touch dash trim in black, an eight-inch infotainment touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto connectivity and an eight-speaker audio system.

    Also on the kit list are a reverse camera, remote engine start, single-zone automatic climate control, paddle shifters and cruise control. The RS adds on leather and suede combination upholstery, alloy pedals, black headlining, red illumination for the air-con controls as well as a seven-inch TFT instrument display and rear air-con vents, the only variant in the hatch line-up to have it.

    In general, the cabin is a comfortable place to be in over long periods – I spent more than a week with the RS sedan late last year and particularly liked the sense of spaciousness in the cabin and how most things are presented – this was mirrored by the hatch during the drive. There’s still some cheap plastic feel to some bits, but thankfully they’re largely away from major contact points.

    Same engines and safety kit

    No change to the powertrain and drivetrain line-up – the Grade S, E and V variants all feature an L15Z 1.5 litre DOHC i-VTEC four-cylinder, paired with an Earth Dreams CVT and offering 121 PS at 6,600 rpm and 145 Nm at 4,300 rpm.

    Meanwhile, the RS has the same i-MMD system as seen on the hybrid version of the sedan, consisting of a primary electric traction motor with 109 PS and 253 Nm providing drive through a single-speed transmission, with an Atkinson-cycle version of the 1.5 litre mill acting as a generator to recharge the battery. The mill, which has 98 PS from 5,600 to 6,400 rpm and 127 Nm between 4,500 and 5,000 rpm, can also clutch in to provide mechanical drive at higher running speeds.

    REVIEW: 2022 Honda City Hatchback in Malaysia – RS e:HEV hybrid and V, priced from RM88k to RM108k

    As for safety, up to the point of the drive, only the RS e:HEV came equipped with the automaker’s Sensing suite of driver assistance kit. Since then, the company has announced the V-Sensing, which now sits in between the standard Grade V and RS in terms of placement.

    On the City, the suite is made up of adaptive cruise control, autonomous emergency braking with pedestrian, cyclist and oncoming vehicle detection, forward collision warning, lane keep assist system, road departure mitigation, lane departure warning and auto high beam. As it is with the sedan, there’s no Low Speed Follow function.

    All that bit firmer, yes

    If you believe the sell made on the on-paper qualifications for the i-MMD, you’ll have it being as good as a 2.5 litre mill in terms of pull. The reality, however, says otherwise. What’s on call in the RS hatch (and sedan) provides decent tractability, but nowhere as blistering as the shout makes it to be, especially when you floor it from standstill.

    Sure, it’s a bit faster than the V off the bat to the century, but in a system geared more for efficiency (and fuel savings) rather than pure performance the differences are marginal. The major difference is that the hybrid does feel more organic – and quieter – in how it climbs up the speed scale under acceleration.

    Floor the V and there’s a wall of noise, both from the engine and CVT, the latter displaying the whine associated with the type. Parity comes when you’re on the move, and at intermediate speeds, the in-gear movement coming off the petrol variant actually feels snappier, the response cleaner. Actually, if you’re not the sort to floor the accelerator all the time to get where you want to go, you probably won’t find the petrol-only version lacking, because it is tractable.

    Where the difference lies is in the economical nature of the hybrid, as attested by previous long-stint runs with the City RS sedan. Matthew and Danny averaged around 26 and 25 km per litre, the latter over an intra-urban run. Even with a more lead-footed approach, all exclusively over short haul drives within the Klang Valley, I obtained a 22.5 km per litre return, something that would be impossible to match with the petrol variant. Of course, whether it is worth forking out the extra dosh for this ability is another matter entirely.

    In terms of ride, both the V and RS offer the same level of comfort, which is best described as nuggety. It’s not jarring, but the distinctly firmish feel in its secondary ride follows the intended projection scoped for it, which is to offer the car a sportier feel.

    That doesn’t quite translate all the way to handling, which is competent and composed, but not terribly engaging – in this regard it feels more civilian than sport. Much of the detachment comes from a steering devoid of feel, but the chassis responds well enough to keep things tidy and neutral, if a little nose heavy at times.

    About the only real minus is with road noise picked up from the tyres. Hondas aren’t particularly known for their isolation from this, and it’s the one thing that kept surfacing across the drive.

    While attention has been paid to insulating the cabin from other aural intrusions, namely sound deadening mats in the engine bay and polyurethane foam injected into specific areas of the car’s steel structure to reduce NVH levels, the absence of dampening material in the wheel wells means that you do get a fair bit of tyre roar, made all the more apparent because of the reduction of noise from elsewhere.

    What’s the call then?

    REVIEW: 2022 Honda City Hatchback in Malaysia – RS e:HEV hybrid and V, priced from RM88k to RM108k

    By mimicking most of the workings of the City sedan but packaging it in a sportier (well, at least perceived) body type, the automaker is hoping to catch younger buyers wanting the practicality of a City but for which the extra boot space isn’t a necessity, and for which a hatchback is seen as something that projects a more free-spirited nature.

    Will it work? Well, given the growing number of City Hatchbacks on the road, it seems to be, and Honda will be banking on the newfound similarities closing the sales gap between sedan and hatch that was quite wide (in favour of the former) when the Jazz was around.

    The pick of the lot from a technical viewpoint would be the RS, given its green leanings, very much in line with the current ethos. However, at RM107,783, it’s nearly RM20k more than the RM87,856 Grade V, which manages what the RS does for the most part. Even with Sensing added in, the particular V is still over RM16k cheaper at RM91,708. If it feels like a tough ask, it probably is.

    Away from that, it’s a well-presented and practical car, the City Hatchback, and it feels all grown up from before. However, to answer the question posed at the start, it’s not necessarily better, just different. Take that how you will.

    GALLERY: Honda City Hatchback RS e:HEV

    GALLERY: Honda City Hatchback 1.5 V

     
     
  • 2022 Honda City Hatchback RS e:HEV priced at RM108k in Malaysia – hybrid five-door with Sensing

    2022 Honda City Hatchback RS e:HEV priced at RM108k in Malaysia – hybrid five-door with Sensing

    Two months after the launch of the new Honda City Hatchback, Honda Malaysia has finally revealed pricing for the range-topping RS e:HEV model. The hybrid variant is priced at RM107,783 on-the-road without insurance, inclusive of the sales and service tax (SST) rebate valid until June 30.

    As such, the RS e:HEV is nearly RM20,000 more expensive than the next highest trim level, the 1.5 V, and almost RM2,000 dearer than the equivalent sedan. As usual, the price includes a five-year, unlimited-mileage warranty and five times free labour for servicing.

    That money buys you an electric motor that does the hard work of moving the RS e:HEV and pushes out 109 PS and 253 Nm of torque. It is juiced by a lithium-ion battery (which, by the way, is covered by a separate eight-year, unlimited-mileage warranty) and a 1.5 litre Atkinson-cycle i-VTEC four-cylinder engine.

    2022 Honda City Hatchback RS e:HEV priced at RM108k in Malaysia – hybrid five-door with Sensing

    The latter makes 98 PS from 5,600 to 6,400 rpm and 127 Nm between 4,500 and 5,000 rpm, which goes into producing electricity for the motor as well as driving the car directly at higher speeds using a single-speed transmission and a lock-up clutch. So equipped, the RS e:HEV gets from zero to 100 km/h in 9.7 seconds before hitting a top speed of 175 km/h; Honda also claims a fuel consumption figure of 3.6 litres per 100 km.

    Another benefit of choosing the top-of-the-line model is safety. As yet, only the RS e:HEV gets the full Honda Sensing suite of driver assistance features, including autonomous emergency braking, adaptive cruise control, lane centring assist, lane keeping assist and automatic high beam. Six airbags, stability control and the LaneWatch blind spot camera come as standard, as per the 1.5 V.

    On the outside, the sportier RS (short for Road Sailing) is differentiated by a gloss black grille bar, darkened LED headlight internals, louvred front fog light surrounds and a large rear diffuser-like bumper insert (which is covered in a fake carbon fibre pattern, as is the front spoiler). The 16-inch alloy wheels also get a two-tone finish here, while gloss black adorns the door mirrors and tailgate spoiler extensions.

    2022 Honda City Hatchback RS e:HEV priced at RM108k in Malaysia – hybrid five-door with Sensing

    Inside, there’s leather and suede upholstery (with added red trim, not available on the sedan), red stitching, alloy pedals, black headlining and red illumination for the air-conditioning controls, plus a seven-inch instrument display next to an analogue rev counter. The RS is also the only City Hatchback to come with rear air vents, which are standard on the sedan.

    Otherwise, standard equipment is as per the 1.5 V and includes keyless entry with remote engine start, push-button start, soft-touch dashboard trim, single-zone automatic climate control, an eight-inch infotainment touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto connectivity, eight speakers and a reverse camera.

     
     
  • Honda City Hatchback in Malaysia – we ask LPL Rei Sakamoto on why not Jazz, no turbo engine and more

    Honda City Hatchback in Malaysia – we ask LPL Rei Sakamoto on why not Jazz, no turbo engine and more

    Twenty-five years on from its debut, the ASEAN-market Honda City has finally gotten a hatchback variant. The five-door model replaces the evergreen Jazz in the region as the latter becomes more sophisticated (and thus more expensive) in its fourth generation. Building the hatch model off the sedan also allows Honda to offer a sportier-looking rival to the ASEAN Toyota Yaris, itself based on the Vios.

    As far as hatchback conversions go, this is as straightforward as they come, but there are still some questions. Can the City Hatchback fill a Jazz-sized hole in buyers’ hearts, and are there more changes from the sedan beyond the deletion of a separate boot? We speak to large project leader Rei Sakamoto (who, like the e:HEV RS variant’s LPL Satoru Azumi, also had a hand in developing the S660 kei roadster) as well as his translator, Honda Malaysia executive coordinator Yujiro Sugino.

    Question: What is the reasoning behind the City Hatchback replacing the Jazz in the region, and is there a concern customers will miss the practicality and brand recognition of the Jazz?

    Yujiro Sugino: In the Asian and Oceania region, we have a well-built brand with the City, so [we are] cultivating the brand’s legacy. The development was designed to incorporate both sedan and hatchback in order to maximise efficiency and to build both sedan and hatchback variants based on the same platform. So it was a regional decision.

    The City Hatchback replaces the Jazz for the ASEAN region

    The City Hatchback exceeds the practicality that the previous Jazz used to offer, plus with the development of the new City, we think we can provide more value to customers.

    We’d like to point out at this juncture that the City Hatchback actually offers less boot space than the outgoing Jazz, at 289 litres versus 363. This deficit continues with the seats folded down – the City’s maximum cargo room of 841 litres trails the Jazz by a full 40 litres.

    Plus, the City’s 36 mm reduction in height will likely result in lower headroom and less space to fit taller items with the base of the rear Ultra Seats tipped up. However, the City is wider than the Jazz and has a longer wheelbase, which means it should provide more legroom and shoulder room.

    Q: Was the hatch planned for the City from the beginning or did the idea of a five-door come later?

    YS: For the five-door development, it was incorporated from the beginning in conjunction with the four-door. Due to COVID-19, the roll-out and launch has been delayed, but the five-door has been in the planning from the beginning.

    Honda City Hatchback in Malaysia – we ask LPL Rei Sakamoto on why not Jazz, no turbo engine and more

    Q: Has there been any tweaks to the suspension and chassis compared to the sedan?

    Rei Sakamoto: For the handling, first of all, the components we used for the sedan and hatchback are common, but the settings are different. For the hatchback, it is intended to make it [feel] more young and active with a sporty feel.

    The hatchback [also] receives the centre [fuel] tank layout which makes the front a little bit heavier compared to the sedan.

    Honda also confirmed that the body-in-white is 7.3 kg lighter than the sedan’s, although the addition of the large tailgate and the Ultra Seats means that the full car is actually slightly heavier spec-by-spec. The City Hatchback also benefits from a six-per-cent increase in torsional rigidity compared to the third-generation Jazz, but the sedan version is stiffer still.

    Q: Why has Honda stuck with the LaneWatch camera for the ASEAN region, whereas markets like Japan, Europe and the United States are switching to blind spot monitoring used by other carmakers?

    RS: For this City’s development, requests from all countries and regions were considered along with the price positioning. That is the reason why chose to apply LaneWatch for the City.

    Honda City Hatchback in Malaysia – we ask LPL Rei Sakamoto on why not Jazz, no turbo engine and more

    Q: Honda City models fitted with Honda Sensing come with an electronic parking brake, which usually enables Low Speed Follow functionality for the adaptive cruise control. However, the City does not get Low Speed Follow. Why is that?

    RS: If there’s a market demand and need [for the system], it will be considered, but considering the positioning of the City, we determined we would develop it without Low Speed Follow.

    Q: Hatchbacks usually have a sportier image compared to sedans, so a turbocharged engine – like the one offered in Thailand – would seem an ideal power plant for the car. Why do Malaysians get a naturally-aspirated engine instead?

    YS: The application of the powertrain [takes into consideration] each country’s government’s tax schemes, not only the output and performance. In Thailand we applied [the 1.0 litre turbo engine] due to the tax incentive scheme, whereas in Malaysia it was determined that the 1.5 litre i-VTEC would be best for the petrol variant.

    Honda City Hatchback in Malaysia – we ask LPL Rei Sakamoto on why not Jazz, no turbo engine and more

    Q: The previous City (and Jazz) Hybrid were fitted with the Intelligent Dual-Clutch Drive (i-DCD) powertrain. Why was the system discontinued after only one generation in favour of the Intelligent Multi-Mode Drive (i-MMD) for the new e:HEV model?

    RS: Considering the cost and price positioning and to optimise efficiency, we determined that the two-motor hybrid system would be the [most suitable for the car].

    Q: The new City gets an aftermarket touchscreen head unit instead of the OEM system found in the latest fourth-generation Jazz, which is shared with the Accord and soon-to-be-launched Civic. Was this done due to cost or were there other considerations for this?

    RS: It is based on the consideration within the Asian and Oceania destinations where price is also considered.

    The Honda City Hatchback was launched in Malaysia earlier this week, priced from RM75,670 to RM83,080 for the petrol variants. The e:HEV RS hybrid will be made available in early 2022, with pricing to be announced then. You can check out our video and written reviews, while full specifications and equipment can be found at CarBase.my.

    GALLERY: Honda City Hatchback 1.5 V in Malaysia


    GALLERY: Honda City Hatchback e:HEV RS in Malaysia

     
     
  • 2022 Honda City Hatchback walk-around in Malaysia

    Honda Malaysia has finally launched the City Hatchback here in Malaysia, a new five-door model which replaces the popular Jazz in the Southeast Asian region. Three variants are available from launch, starting with the base 1.5 S at RM75,670, the 1.5 E at RM83,080, and the 1.5 V at RM87,860.

    The fourth e:HEV RS hybrid will only be available in early 2022, with pricing to be announced then. Unlike the four-door, the hatch does not get the recently-introduced 1.5 V Sensing, which adds a host of active safety features. Since the order books opened, the company received over 2,000 bookings.

    Between this and the sedan, there are a few unique trim differences that separate the two, besides the obvious body style. The powertrain and drivetrain offerings are the same, though, so the S, E and V share the same 1.5 litre DOHC i-VTEC four-cylinder, producing 121 PS at 6,600 rpm and 145 Nm of torque at 4,300 rpm. An Earth Dreams CVT sends drive to the front wheels.

    As for the e:HEV, that car is powered by a 109 PS/253 Nm electric motor, juiced by a Atkinson-cycle version of the 1.5 litre mill. The latter, which churns out 98 PS from 5,600 to 6,400 rpm and 127 Nm between 4,500 and 5,000 rpm, can also clutch in to provide motive power at higher speeds, where it is at its most efficient.

    The City Hatchback is available in five exterior colours, including the new Ignite Red and Meteorite Grey Metallic. The three other hues shared with the sedan are Platinum White and Crystal Black Pearl and Lunar Silver Metallic. As with the four-door, the RS is only offered in red, white and grey. Want to know what it’s like to drive? You can check out our video and written reviews, while full specifications and equipment can be found at CarBase.my.

    GALLERY: Honda City Hatchback 1.5 V in Malaysia


    GALLERY: Honda City Hatchback e:HEV RS in Malaysia
    GALLERY: Honda City Hatchback official photos

     
     
  • Honda City Hatchback launched in Malaysia – 1.5L i-VTEC priced from RM76k, e:HEV RS hybrid early 2022

    Honda City Hatchback launched in Malaysia – 1.5L i-VTEC priced from RM76k, e:HEV RS hybrid early 2022

    After a drawn-out marketing campaign that began in October, Honda Malaysia has finally launched the City Hatchback today. The five-door, which replaces the Jazz in the Southeast Asian region, brings some of its predecessor’s practicality to the more conventional City shape.

    Four variants are offered, all shared with the sedan. The petrol models consist of the RM75,670 1.5 S, the RM83,080 1.5 E and the RM87,860 1.5 V. The e:HEV RS hybrid will be available later in early 2022, with pricing to be announced then. Unlike the four-door, the hatch does not get the recently-introduced 1.5 V Sensing, which adds a host of active safety features.

    All prices are on-the-road without insurance, inclusive of the sales and service tax (SST) rebate, a five-year unlimited-mileage warranty and five times free labour for servicing. The e:HEV also gets an eight-year, unlimited-mileage warranty for its lithium-ion battery. To date, Honda Malaysia has received over 2,000 bookings since the company opened orders; it’s also targeting around 1,000 sales a month.

    Honda City Hatchback launched in Malaysia – 1.5L i-VTEC priced from RM76k, e:HEV RS hybrid early 2022

    The engines are also shared with the sedan, with the conventional petrol unit being a 1.5 litre DOHC i-VTEC four-cylinder, producing 121 PS at 6,600 rpm and 145 Nm of torque at 4,300 rpm. It is mated to the usual CVT, with drive sent to the front wheels.

    As for the e:HEV, that car is powered by a 109 PS/253 Nm electric motor, juiced by a Atkinson-cycle version of the 1.5 litre mill. The latter, which churns out 98 PS from 5,600 to 6,400 rpm and 127 Nm between 4,500 and 5,000 rpm, can also clutch in to provide motive power at higher speeds, where it is at its most efficient.

    On the outside, the City Hatchback is very similar to the sedan, sharing the entire front end (all hatch models get the RS’ honeycomb grille) and four of its doors. The tailgate and shortened rear end are the obvious main points of difference, but the car also gets unique taillights (still with LED light guides and in a trapezoidal shape) and bumper (also with vertical reflectors).

    Honda City Hatchback launched in Malaysia – 1.5L i-VTEC priced from RM76k, e:HEV RS hybrid early 2022

    In terms of dimensions, the hatch is 204 mm shorter at 4,349 mm, while the height has also been increased by three millimetres to 1,470 mm for a sleeker roofline. The 1,748 mm width and 2,600 mm wheelbase are shared with the sedan.

    The similarities with the four-door continue on the inside, with the hatch getting the same dashboard (with gloss black air vent trim as standard, just like the RS sedan), three-spoke steering wheel and front seats. The repositioning of the fuel tank to below the front seats frees up space for the Jazz’s rear Ultra Seats, the base of which can be tipped up to fit tall items like houseplants. The different design of the back pews enables the car to offer more foot room than the sedan.

    The boot measures 289 litres with all seats up, which is 230 litres less than the sedan and more than 70 litres down on the outgoing third-generation Jazz. Fold the rear seats down and you get 841 litres of space, or 1,189 litres up to the roof.

    Honda City Hatchback launched in Malaysia – 1.5L i-VTEC priced from RM76k, e:HEV RS hybrid early 2022

    The City Hatchback e:HEV RS will be available later on in early 2022

    Standard equipment is almost identical to the sedan and includes halogen projector headlights with LED daytime running lights, 15-inch silver alloy wheels, keyless entry, push-button start, manual air-conditioning, fabric upholstery, a Bluetooth-enabled head unit and four speakers.

    Move up to the E variant and you get two-tone alloys, remote engine start, single-zone automatic climate control, paddle shifters, cruise control, an eight-inch infotainment touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto connectivity and a reverse camera. The V adds full-LED headlights and front fog lights, 16-inch silver alloys, leather upholstery (hatch adds white piping and stitching), soft-touch dash trim (black here instead of ivory on the sedan) and eight speakers.

    The e:HEV RS receives a sportier look with a gloss black front grille bar, door mirrors and rear spoiler extensions, along with slatted fog light surrounds, a black rear bumper insert and 16-inch two-tone alloys. Inside, there’s leather and suede upholstery (with added red trim, not available on the sedan), alloy pedals, black headlining and red illumination for the air-con controls, plus a seven-inch instrument display. One major difference from the sedan is that only the RS comes with rear air vents, which are standard on the four-door.

    Honda City Hatchback launched in Malaysia – 1.5L i-VTEC priced from RM76k, e:HEV RS hybrid early 2022

    Safety-wise, the City Hatchback comes as standard with four airbags and stability control, with the V adding the LaneWatch blind spot camera and curtain airbags (six airbags in total). The e:HEV RS is the only model to get the Honda Sensing suite of driver assistance systems, including autonomous emergency braking with pedestrian, cyclist and oncoming vehicle detection, adaptive cruise control, lane centring assist, lane keeping assist and automatic high beam.

    As per the sedan, the hatch gets Honda Connect services that include automatic collision and alarm detection, speed and geofencing alerts, a vehicle locator and emergency calls. The smartphone app also allows users to check their vehicle status, control their car remotely and be reminded of their next service.

    The City Hatchback is available in five exterior colours, including the new Ignite Red and Meteorite Grey Metallic. The three other hues shared with the sedan are Platinum White and Crystal Black Pearl and Lunar Silver Metallic. As with the four-door, the RS is only offered in red, white and grey. Want to know what it’s like to drive? You can check out our video and written reviews, while full specifications and equipment can be found at CarBase.my.

    GALLERY: Honda City Hatchback 1.5 V in Malaysia


    GALLERY: Honda City Hatchback e:HEV RS in Malaysia
    GALLERY: Honda City Hatchback official photos

     
     
  • REVIEW: 2021 Honda City Hatchback in Malaysia

    REVIEW: 2021 Honda City Hatchback in Malaysia

    For a market that is seemingly obsessed with sedans and SUVs, it’s surprising that the best-selling passenger car in Malaysia over the past decade has been a hatchback – the Perodua Myvi. That could easily change should a Myvi sedan exist one day, but let’s not hold our breaths.

    Meanwhile, existing owners planning for a badge upgrade can soon get their hands on the 2021 Honda City Hatchback. In terms of pricing, the hatch is expected to cost slightly less than its sedan counterpart, which ranges from RM74k to RM106k. A slight reduction in price will help it fit in the same bracket as the Toyota Yaris, which is priced between RM71k to RM85k.

    We’re not expecting a big drop in equipment levels, so the feature set between the hatch and sedan should be like for like. We’ll only know for sure during the launch, because the fleet of three (two RS e:HEV, one V) at the Sepang International Circuit were so-called pre-production models.

    Read the full review of the 2021 Honda City Hatchback, here.

     
     
  • 2021 Honda City Hatchback Malaysia specs revealed – new red, grey exterior colours; Ultra Seats, Sensing

    2021 Honda City Hatchback Malaysia specs revealed – new red, grey exterior colours; Ultra Seats, Sensing

    Honda Malaysia has just held a preview of the upcoming City Hatchback at the Sepang International Circuit, giving us a first glimpse of the Jazz replacement ahead of launch. Just two variants were shown to the press (the V and RS e:HEV), so we’ll have to save the S and E variants for later.

    Let’s kick things off with the new stuff, starting with exterior colours. The hatch looks to be donning the new Ignite Red Metallic, which is a slightly deeper red compared to Passion Red Pearl that is currently on offer.

    There’s also a new shade of grey that appears much darker compared to the existing Modern Steel Metallic, and a quick check on Honda Thailand’s website reveals that the paint is called Meteoroid Grey Metallic. This would be a first for Honda cars in Malaysia, though it remains to be seen if the colour will be extended to other CKD models as well.

    2021 Honda City Hatchback Malaysia specs revealed – new red, grey exterior colours; Ultra Seats, Sensing

    According to the company, the hatch has a slight increase in torsional rigidity compared to the sedan, and more sound deadening materials (including under-bonnet insulation) have been used to improve NVH levels. The rear wheel wells remain bare, but we were told that the cars on display were pre-production units, so this may or may not change at launch.

    For the RS, the facial treatment is identical to its sedan counterpart, so it gets full LED headlights, LED fog lights, gloss black Solid Wing grille with honeycomb inserts, faux carbon-fibre front lip, black side mirror caps, blue-accented Honda logo, as well as RS badges front and rear.

    There’s also a single LED used for the rear license plate number, which is an upgrade from the sedan. The RS is the only variant to get the chunky split rear diffuser with carbon print, while vertical reflectors and LED combination tail lights are standard issue.

    Both the V and RS ride on 16-inch wheels that are identical in design to their respective sedan siblings, and the factory tyres are the same Toyo Proxes R57. To differentiate the hatch a bit further, the lower grille insert on the City Hatchback V gets the same honeycomb treatment as the RS, whereas the sedan wears the more conventional twin louvred version.

    For the interior, Honda Malaysia is only permitting us to reveal three features, starting with the eight-inch touchscreen display. This is of course identical to the sedan, so it should support Apple CarPlay and Android Auto (wired connection), and it could also be hooked up to the same eight-speaker sound system.

    The second feature would be the rear air vents, which again, are exactly the same ones found in the sedan. The final and arguably the feature that makes the City Hatchback unique is Ultra Seats. This function is essentially carried over from the Jazz, and offers four flexible seating arrangements – Refresh, Long, Tall and Utility modes. If you’re looking for a practical hatch, this one is hard to beat.

    Mechanically, the hatch is identical to the sedan, so the 1.5 litre DOHC i-VTEC mill delivers 121 PS and 145 Nm of torque, making it among the most powerful in its segment. A CVT drives the front wheels. Meanwhile, the RS e:HEV gets Honda’s complex i-MMD hybrid system, which offers 109 PS and 253 Nm of torque. Click here to learn all about how the hybrid system works in our in-depth review.

    Now, Honda Sensing seems to be reserved only for the top RS e:HEV variant, offering the same seven functions as the sedan. There’s adaptive cruise control (without low speed follow), collision mitigation braking system (AEB, front only), forward collision warning, lane keep assist system, road departure mitigation, lane departure warning, and auto high beam. The V model on show did not seem to be equipped with Sensing, so it remains to be seen if there will be a V Sensing variant.

    Size-wise, the hatch measures 4,345 mm long (4,349 mm with RS bumpers; 208 mm shorter than the sedan), 1,488 mm tall (+21 mm), 1,748 mm wide and has a wheelbase of 2,589 mm. Compared to the outgoing Jazz, the City Hatch is longer and wider, but less tall. The Jazz’s wheelbase is 59 mm shorter. Not long till the launch now, so watch this space! In the meantime, what do you think of the car so far?

    GALLERY: 2021 Honda City Hatchback RS e:HEV and V previewed at Sepang Circuit

    GALLERY: 2021 Honda City Hatchback Press Photos

     
     
  • 2022 Honda City Hatchback Malaysia product video features many Toyotas – first look at 1.5L V spec petrol

    2022 Honda City Hatchback Malaysia product video features many Toyotas – first look at 1.5L V spec petrol

    Honda Malaysia (HM) opened order books for the new 2022 Honda City Hatchback this morning, and released some official details along with that announcement. As expected, a 1.5 litre DOHC i-VTEC petrol version (121 PS/145 Nm) will be available for the Jazz replacement model, along with the top spec e:HEV hybrid (109 PS/253 Nm) that starred in all previous teasers.

    Like the City sedan, the hatch version’s e:HEV variant is the only one that gets the sportier RS trim, which includes a gloss black front grille and “eyebrows”, black honeycomb mesh, carbon-pattern trim on the front lip and sportier “toothed” front fog lamp garnish and RS badges.

    The RS and V variants (latter is the top petrol grade) get LED headlights with LED daytime running lights, LED fog lights, LED tail lights and 16-inch wheels.

    The video also shows the V, the first time we’re seeing a Malaysia-spec non-hybrid City Hatchback. Like a sedan City V without the RS kit, it sports a chrome grille and bright single-tone multi-spoke alloys. The V’s rear bumper lacks the black two-part “diffuser” trim seen on the RS, and an “i-VTEC” rear badge takes the place of “e:HEV”.

    Other announced features include the practical four-mode “Ultra Seats” made famous by the Jazz (rear seat base can be flipped up to fit tall items), remote engine start and climate pre-conditioning (RS and V only), rear air vents, electric parking brake (RS only), Honda LaneWatch (RS and V) as well as Honda Sensing. Here, the ADAS pack is reserved for the RS. Over in the sedan camp, HM introduced the V Sensing last week, the only way to get the safety kit without going hybrid.

    Like in the sedan, Sensing includes adaptive cruise control (without low speed follow), collision mitigation braking system (AEB), forward collision warning, lane keep assist system, road departure mitigation, lane departure warning, and auto high beam.

    On to the video. HM’s product videos are always entertaining, because there are always cameos from the other brand. Of course, the Honda beats all comers, superhero style. Instead of us pointing out which competitor models are involved here, go on and play spot the Toyota.

    The clip shows a bunch of young friends going on camping trip, and how all the City Hatchback’s features fit into everyday life. The highlighted unique selling points are remote engine start (with climate pre-conditioning), Ultra Seats, Honda LaneWatch (video feed pitted against blind spot warning lamp), the 1.5L i-MMD hybrid powertrain with 253 Nm of torque, rear air con vents (unique for a compact hatch), Honda Sensing and the electronic parking brake.

    Not explicitly mentioned via supers, but shown, are things like the touchscreen head unit, which has Android Auto and Apple CarPlay support, as is the norm for Honda; the rear LED signatures; the spacious rear boot and auto brake hold. Look out for the “Hatch Matters” scenes for rival brand comparisons. “Y stay average? Step up your game,” the social media caption reads, an obvious reference to the “Y” UMW Toyota uses for Yaris marketing.

    More on the City Hatchback here – what do you think of this Yaris rival? There’s also the small matter of the impending Myvi facelift, which is going up in both tech and price.

    GALLERY: 2022 Honda City Hatchback official images, Malaysia spec

     
     
 
 
 

Latest Fuel Prices

PETROL
RON 95 RM2.05 (0.00)
RON 97 RM3.47 (0.00)
RON 100 RM5.00
VPR RM6.30
DIESEL
EURO 5 B10 RM3.35 (0.00)
EURO 5 B7 RM3.55 (0.00)
Last Updated Jul 11, 2024