Production of the Proton Satria Neo may have ended back in 2015, but Jeremy from JayEmm on Cars recently reviewed the three-door hatchback to find out if it’s “the least cool car for young people?”

The Satria Neo was first sold in the United Kingdom – where JayEmm on Cars is based – in 2007, and this specific example was loaned to Jeremy by a Thomas, a 24-year-old student who bought it to use while his diesel-powered MINI was being sorted.

Thomas was apparently given 1,500 British pounds (RM8,229) to buy a car, but rather than going for mass-market options like the Ford Fiesta or Nissan Micra, he opted for the Satria Neo because he took a gap year from university to earn some money to carry on with his education – going with the most affordable option was clearly his priority.

What he ended up with was a base-spec Satria Neo 1.3 GSX, which Jeremy gets behind the wheel of to find out if Thomas “made a complete fool of himself.” The Cliff Notes version of Jeremy’s discoveries include a rather attractive front end but beyond that point, the car is described as being a cross between a sixth-generation Fiesta and a MG ZR.

The interior also didn’t impress the reviewer, who called it “low-rent” and wasn’t a fan of the power window switches that are awkwardly placed beside the handbrake. Jeremy also lamented the lack of interior space inside the cabin, including for those trying to fit into the rear seats.

As for driving impressions, the CamPro 1.3 litre naturally-aspirated four-cylinder engine delivered just 94 hp and 120 Nm of torque, which also didn’t impress, but the five-speed manual gearbox did, being one of the car’s strengths.

Another positive is the car’s handling when you’re looking for a bit of fun, as the steering had a nice sense of weight and adjustability. The front MacPherson struts and rear multi-link suspension, while “far too stiff,” is pretty good for spirited driving and the turning circle is decent too.

However, Jeremy brings back a few negatives of the Satria Neo approaching the end of his review, saying that the car, given its engine capacity, struggles to hit 40 mpg (17 km/l). It’s also difficult to find spare parts since Proton dealerships vacated the UK about five years ago. These days, he said you can find a Satria Neo – with an MOT certificate – for less than 600 British pounds (RM3,290).

There are many more things said in the 15-minute review that we didn’t mention, so if you have some free time, you can find out what else Jeremy touches upon. For existing or past owners, is his review reflective of your ownership experience? Tell us what you think in the comments below.