Here’s another special number plate series, UA. Tender for numbers UA 1 to UA 9999 are open till October 1, and results are scheduled to be released on October 8. UA number plates can only be registered at the main JPJ Wangsa Maju outlet.

The management secretariat does not state what UA stands for, or what organisation the tender proceeds will go to. However, bank drafts are supposed to be addressed to “IM4U Plat”, which means that it might be from the same people behind the IM4U special series, one of the early ones that hit the streets back in 2013. IM4U stands for 1Malaysia For Youth.

Wait, aren’t special number plates from private organisations no longer allowed by the new government? In May, transport minister Anthony Loke said that the practice will end, as “this is government revenue and we intend to collect all of it.” He explained that the NGOs that issue the plates pay JPJ RM1 million for the rights, which is way lower than what they collect from sales, which is estimated at RM20 million.

In June, Loke said that special series plates that were previously approved will still be able to be sold over the next year. There will be no extension and renewal of the one-year grace period to sell and register these numbers, he said.

The last special plate introduced by private organisations was YA, but there have been a host of special plates in recent times. These include UUU, UP, G1G-G999G, X, XX, YY, UU, GTR, GG, SAM, K1M, T1M, A1M, US, SMS, NBOS, NAAM, VIP, G, GT, U, Y, PERFECT, PATRIOT and FB by JPJ itself.

The government has wasted no time in getting in the game itself, and its recently launched “Malaysia” series set a new record for the highest sum paid for a specific vehicle registration plate, with RM1,111,111 being paid for “Malaysia 1”. The bid by Aldi International broke the previous record held by “V1”, which was purchased for RM989,000 in 2016. The exercise raked in RM13.1 million for the government.